Trials

  • September 22, 2023

    Accountant, Atty Convicted In $1.3B Tax Case In Georgia

    A Georgia jury found two men guilty on Friday of conspiring to defraud the government by promoting a scheme that sold $1.3 billion in fraudulent tax deductions in connection with conservation easements, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • September 22, 2023

    'Boogaloo' Ideology Swayed Driver in Court Murder, Jury Told

    A man charged with driving the getaway vehicle during the fatal 2020 shooting of a federal courthouse security guard was driven by the extremist "Boogaloo" ideology, a desire to overthrow the government and "deep animosity" for the judicial system, prosecutors told jurors during trial closing arguments on Friday.

  • September 22, 2023

    Giuliani Ordered To Cough Up $237K In Ga. Poll Workers' Suit

    Rudy Giuliani owes roughly $237,000 stemming from unpaid sanctions and legal fees in a suit brought by Georgia poll workers who say he accused them of ballot fraud in the 2020 presidential election, according to an order issued Friday.

  • September 22, 2023

    Roundup User Tells Jury Agriculture Jobs Didn't Cause Cancer

    A longtime Roundup user took the stand Friday in his cancer trial against Monsanto, acknowledging his decadeslong career in the agrochemical industry but saying his work gave him far less pesticide exposure than his regular summertime Roundup use.

  • September 22, 2023

    Philly PD's Win In Miscarriage Suit Tossed Over Pot Reference

    Two Philadelphia police officers accused of causing a woman's miscarriage had their jury verdict win yanked by the Third Circuit after it ruled that evidence about the woman's marijuana usage was improperly allowed into the trial and likely skewed jurors' opinions on the matter.

  • September 22, 2023

    Excess Insurer Balks At $22.5M Ask In Kroger Shooting Row

    An insurer for The Kroger Co. urged a Georgia state court to reject another Kroger insurer's bid to recoup $22.5 million it paid toward a $50 million settlement over a shooting in 2015, following a jury's $61.4 million verdict against the grocery giant.

  • September 22, 2023

    Marriott Hit With $20M Verdict In Calif. Worker's Disability Suit

    A San Francisco jury said Thursday that the Marriott Marquis hotel must pay $20 million in damages after finding that it failed to engage in an interactive process and to provide reasonable accommodation to one of its disabled employees.

  • September 22, 2023

    Ga. City Can't Escape $33M Verdict Over Yale Student's Death

    A Georgia trial court has denied the city of Milton's attempt to avoid a $33 million award over the death of a Yale University student whose car crashed into an ornamental roadside planter, saying the jury's verdict was sufficiently supported by the evidence.

  • September 22, 2023

    Judge Calls Some Of Trump's Args 'Crazy' In NY Fraud Case

    A New York state judge on Friday pounded the bench as he expressed frustration with arguments made by Donald Trump's attorneys over what claims, if any, he can rule on ahead of trial in the massive fraud case against the former president, his sons and their business, calling some recurring arguments "literally crazy."

  • September 22, 2023

    Monsanto Bid To Nix Deposition From PCB Trial Irks Judge

    A Washington state judge chided Monsanto's attorneys on Friday for last-minute objections to evidence in a product liability trial alleging PCB chemical-induced illnesses, saying the company had missed its chance to block the admission of records suggesting it knew a research lab was falsifying its toxicity studies in the 1970s.

  • September 22, 2023

    Google Fights $339M Verdict Finding Chromecast Infringed IP

    Google has urged a Texas federal judge to overturn a jury's $338.7 million verdict finding its Chromecast devices infringed Touchstream Technologies Inc.'s patents, and it is seeking a new trial, arguing Touchstream "biased the jury in its favor by focusing on its unmeritorious willfulness case, without carrying its burden on alleged infringement."

  • September 22, 2023

    Judge Delivers Clarity In Ambac RMBS Suit Against US Bank

    A New York federal judge is allowing Ambac to press forward with litigation over losses incurred when several residential mortgage-backed securities trusts faltered during the financial crisis, in a ruling this week that weighed a key element of the contract dispute over who should bear the financial burden of some $340 million in damages.

  • September 22, 2023

    Dueling Doctor Opinions Right For Jury Decision, Panel Finds

    A split Ohio state appeals panel has affirmed a jury verdict in favor of a man who suffered complications after a prostate procedure, ruling that the trial court was right to let a jury weigh the opinions of conflicting experts rather than issue a ruling.

  • September 22, 2023

    Doc's Plea In NBA Fraud Case Would Leave 2 To Stand Trial

    A Seattle physician indicated to a Manhattan federal judge Friday that he will plead guilty in the $5 million NBA benefits scam, a move that would leave just two out of 24 named defendants set to go to trial in November.

  • September 22, 2023

    Dealer Seeks 25 Years In Deaths Of Akin Gump Atty, 2 Others

    A New Jersey man convicted of distributing the drugs that killed three young Manhattan professionals, including a first-year lawyer at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, asked a federal court for a 25-year prison sentence, the minimum punishment recommended by probation officials.

  • September 22, 2023

    Ex-Michigan State Rep. Can't Dodge Bribery Retrial

    A former Michigan state lawmaker was denied a federal court bid this week to escape a second trial on charges that he sold his vote while in office for campaign contributions.

  • September 22, 2023

    Texas AG Paxton's Troubles Endure After Impeachment Win

    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is back on the job after being cleared by the Texas Senate at his impeachment trial over his ties to real estate investor Nate Paul. Yet the embattled politician's legal troubles are far from over.

  • September 22, 2023

    Russian Exec Should Get 21 Mos. For Asylum Fraud, Feds Say

    The co-director of an immigration assistance company should get 21 months in prison for facilitating years of asylum fraud, perjuring himself during trial and defending his conduct after his conviction, Manhattan federal prosecutors said in a filing Thursday.

  • September 22, 2023

    Ex-Consultant Gets 8 Years In Prison For Lawyer Bomb Hoax

    A former management consultant was sentenced Friday to eight years and two months in prison at a London court for waging a harassment campaign against leading financial crime lawyers that culminated in a fake bomb attack on their office in the capital's legal district.

  • September 22, 2023

    How Latham Attys Won $200M Trade Secrets Case In Ga. Trial

    Following almost nine years of litigation, Georgia manufacturer Universal Alloy Corp. defeated allegations it stole Alcoa's trade secrets and a $200 million contract with Boeing for aircraft wing parts. Here, UAC's lead trial attorneys from Latham & Watkins LLP reveal to Law360 how they did it.

  • September 21, 2023

    Monsanto's Track Record On PCB Warnings Debated At Trial

    An industrial historian reviewing Monsanto's decades-old internal files on polychlorinated biphenyls told a Washington state jury in a product liability case Thursday that there's evidence the company purged studies demonstrating the dangers of PCBs in the early 1970s amid growing public concerns about their toxicity.

  • September 21, 2023

    Bankman-Fried Will Stay In Jail Ahead Of Trial, 2nd Circ. Rules

    FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried will not be released from pretrial detention after he leaked a key witness' diary to the press, the Second Circuit ruled on Thursday, agreeing with the district court that he likely tried to tamper with witnesses in the looming criminal trial.

  • September 21, 2023

    Defense Grills Lead Investigator In $11M Medicare Fraud Trial

    Defense counsel traded barbs with a lead investigator in the government's Medicare fraud case against a Charlotte, North Carolina, telemedicine doctor Thursday, hinting to the jury that investigators ignored evidence and pursued a case against the physician without thoroughly digging into other potential "players."

  • September 21, 2023

    Fla. Jury Hears Openings In 'Take Care Of Maya' Med Mal Case

    Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital missed a crucial diagnosis for Maya Kowalski, the child at the center of the Netflix documentary "Take Care of Maya," and falsely imprisoned and abused her, which drove her mother to suicide, an attorney for the Kowalski family told jurors Thursday.

  • September 21, 2023

    Gilead Sciences Gets Initial OK On $247M HIV Antitrust Deal

    A California federal judge on Thursday granted preliminary approval to Gilead's deal to pay the direct purchasers of its HIV medications $246.8 million to end claims the pharmaceutical company cut a deal with Teva to delay generic versions, saying considering the litigation risks, "the settlement is a reasonable one."

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Opinion

    Calif. Ruling Got It Wrong On Trial Courts' Gatekeeping Role

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    Ten years after the California Supreme Court reshaped trial judges’ role in admitting expert opinion testimony, a state appeals court's Bader v. Johnson & Johnson ruling appears to undermine this precedent and will likely create confusion about the scope of trial courts’ gatekeeping responsibility, say Robert Wright and Nicole Hood at Horvitz & Levy.

  • How Jan. 6 Riot Cases Could Affect White Collar Defendants

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    Though the prosecutions of individuals involved in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol deal with fact patterns markedly different from white collar offenses, the emerging case law on what it means to act “corruptly” will likely pose risks and opportunities for white collar defendants and their attorneys, says Ben Jernigan at Zuckerman Spaeder.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Developers Are Testing Defenses In Generative AI Litigation

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    In the rapidly growing field of generative artificial intelligence law in the U.S., there are a few possible defenses that have already been effectively asserted by defendants in litigation, including lack of standing, reliance on the fair use doctrine, and the legality of so-called data scraping, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Corporate Compliance Lessons From FirstEnergy Scandal

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    Fallout from a massive bribery scheme involving Ohio electric utility FirstEnergy and state officeholders — including the recent sentencing of two defendants — has critical corporate governance takeaways for companies and individuals seeking to influence government policymaking, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Minn. Product Case Highlights Challenges Of Misuse Defense

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    The recent decision by a Minnesota federal court in McDougall v. CRC Industries illustrates that even where a product that is clearly being misused results in personal injuries, manufacturers cannot necessarily rely on the misuse defense to absolve them of liability exposure, says Timothy Freeman at Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • A Higher Bar For Surviving Summary Judgment In SC Courts

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    The South Carolina Supreme Court's recent decision in Kitchen Planners v. Friedman, rejecting a lower court's usage of the mere scintilla standard for allowing cases to proceed, suggests that the mere existence of an alleged factual dispute between parties will no longer be sufficient to thwart a well-supported motion for summary judgment, says Denver Smith at Butler Snow.

  • 3rd Circ. Ruling Fine-Tunes The 'But It's Hemp' Defense

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    The Third Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Rivera decision, upholding the appellant’s conviction for marijuana possession, clarifies that defendants charged with trafficking marijuana have the burden of proving that the cannabis is actually federally legal hemp under the 2018 Farm Bill, say attorneys at McGlinchey Stafford.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Tapping The Full Potential Of The Juror Questionnaire

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    Most litigators know that questionnaires can reveal biases that potential jurors would never reveal in voir dire, but to maximize this tool’s utility, attorneys must choose the right questions, interpret responses effectively and weigh several other considerations, say George Speckart and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

  • Lessons From High-Profile Witness Tampering Allegations

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    As demonstrated by recent developments in the cases against former President Donald Trump and FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried, allegations of witness tampering can carry serious consequences — but attorneys can employ certain strategies to mitigate the risk that accusations arise, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

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