Public Policy

  • April 11, 2024

    EPA Says Colo. Air Pollution Plan Approval Was Proper

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday urged the Tenth Circuit to uphold its approval of a Colorado air emissions permitting program, and said a green group's argument that the scheme contains too many exemptions for the oil and gas industry pollution is mistaken.

  • April 11, 2024

    Sen. Menendez's Wife Gets Own Bribery Trial

    A New York federal judge agreed on Thursday to give the wife of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez her own trial in a sprawling case accusing the couple of accepting bribes for using the New Jersey Democrat's influence to further the interests of three businessmen.

  • April 11, 2024

    Treasury Proposes Steeper Foreign Investment Law Penalties

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury issued a notice Thursday proposing to sharpen its procedures and enforcement practices for reviewing foreign investment deals for national security issues, according to an announcement.

  • April 11, 2024

    US Sends Mixed Messages In Enbridge Line 5 Pipeline Dispute

    The U.S. government sent mixed messages to the Seventh Circuit in weighing in on Enbridge's controversial Line 5 oil pipeline, saying a lower court was right to determine that the company is trespassing on tribal lands, but recommended that the case be remanded and that a tribe's public nuisance claim be dismissed. 

  • April 11, 2024

    Trump Camp Must Face 2020 Election Lies Suit

    A Denver trial court rightfully kept intact a former Dominion executive's defamation claims against Donald Trump's presidential campaign and others, accusing them of spreading false claims that the executive helped rig the 2020 election, a Colorado appellate panel ruled Thursday.

  • April 10, 2024

    States, Wild Cards & Time: Hurdles Facing Privacy Law Push

    Congress has what many experts are calling its best chance to enact a national data privacy framework, after key leaders this week announced a surprising deal on the topic. But several factors could still derail the promising proposal, including influential stakeholders that have yet to weigh in, the upcoming election and the longstanding debate over who should enforce the law.

  • April 10, 2024

    UC Berkeley Law Dean Defends Ejecting Protester From Home

    University of California, Berkeley School of Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky on Wednesday defended actions he and his wife, Berkeley law professor Catherine Fisk, took to try to stop a Muslim law student's protest at their home during a dinner for graduating students after an online video of the incident went viral.

  • April 10, 2024

    Push For Bank Capital Hike Has 'Damaged' Fed, Quarles Says

    Federal regulators' Basel III endgame proposal to raise big-bank capital requirements has "damaged" the reputation of the Federal Reserve and cannot be salvaged just by watering it down, the central bank's former bank regulatory chief said Wednesday.

  • April 10, 2024

    Nationwide Injunctions Spike Politicizes Judiciary, Study Says

    Nationwide injunctions have dramatically increased in recent years, particularly during the Trump administration, a trend that has politicized the judiciary and risks further politicization without reforms, according to a study published in the Harvard Law Review on Wednesday.

  • April 10, 2024

    GOP Rep. Calls On SEC To Delay Climate Rule Compliance

    A Republican congressman said Wednesday that he plans to ask the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to push back the compliance timeline for controversial rules governing corporate climate disclosures, indicating that the agency's agreement to temporarily stay the rules' implementation during the course of a legal challenge is not enough.

  • April 10, 2024

    Colo. Judge Tosses ACLU Suit Alleging Police Surveillance

    A Colorado federal judge on Wednesday tossed a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of progressive activists claiming a police department unconstitutionally surveilled their activities, finding the police officers were protected by qualified immunity.

  • April 10, 2024

    USPTO Outlines Possible Pitfalls For Attorneys Using AI

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Wednesday detailed risks facing attorneys using artificial intelligence, warning that they must ensure that filings are accurate and humans played a role in inventions, which attorneys say illustrates that ethical rules are unchanged in the AI era.

  • April 10, 2024

    US News Fights Uphill To Block SF's 'Best Hospitals' Probe

    A California federal judge indicated Wednesday he'll likely dismiss U.S. News & World Report's lawsuit challenging the San Francisco City Attorney's subpoenas seeking information about its methodology for ranking hospitals, saying the issue isn't ripe since the subpoenas aren't self-enforcing and the city hasn't yet sued for the information.

  • April 10, 2024

    SEC Says Crypto Firm Kraken Can't 'Subvert' Securities Test

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has told a California federal judge that crypto exchange Kraken is asking the court to adopt a "perversion" of the long-standing U.S. Supreme Court precedent for what constitutes an investment contract.

  • April 10, 2024

    BDO Fights SEC's 'Misdirected' Call For 2nd Circ. Rehearing

    BDO USA LLP is urging the Second Circuit not to reconsider a decision that freed the firm from private litigation over AmTrust Financial Services Inc.'s financial restatements, saying the court should not heed "misdirected concerns" from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission about the ruling's supposed impact on shareholders' ability to sue public company auditors.

  • April 10, 2024

    Lawmakers Ask GAO To Review Native Remains Act

    Two Democratic members of the U.S. House have urged the Government Accountability Office to conduct a thorough review of how the federal Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act is implemented, saying tribes have complained of deficiencies in the return of their ancestral remains and cultural objects.

  • April 10, 2024

    Enforcers Are Learning How To Pursue Suits Against Big Tech

    The pending antitrust cases targeting large technology platforms in the U.S. and Europe, including those against Google, Amazon and Apple, offer important lessons about digital markets, enforcers said Wednesday.

  • April 10, 2024

    US, Mexico Resolve Labor Complaints At Two Mexico Plants

    Workers at two Mexico automotive part facilities can now organize under a union of their choice after concerns of labor violations were resolved through the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement's labor rights tool, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced.

  • April 10, 2024

    NJ GOP Org. Pushes For Controversial Ballot Design

    A Garden State county Republican organization urged a New Jersey state judge on Wednesday to block a county clerk from using the same ballot design recently endorsed by a federal judge for use in the state's Democratic primaries in the county's GOP primary, arguing the clerk does not have the authority to ignore the party's right to associate.

  • April 10, 2024

    Landmark PFAS Rule Faces Battles Over Costs And Science

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday issued the first-ever federal drinking water standards for "forever chemicals," something communities, environmental groups and politicians of both major political parties had been clamoring for. However, experts said the novel rulemaking will attract tough legal battles over implementation costs, supporting science and other elements.

  • April 10, 2024

    Senate Disapproves Of NLRB Joint Employer Rule

    A resolution to block an enjoined National Labor Relations Board rule treating more employers as joint employers is headed to President Joe Biden's desk following a close U.S. Senate vote Wednesday, though the president has pledged not to sign.

  • April 10, 2024

    Dems Introduce Bill To Codify Policy Barring Judge Shopping

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., along with 37 other Democratic and two independent senators, introduced legislation on Wednesday to codify the new Judicial Conference of the United States policy against judge shopping after pushback from Republicans and a Texas court.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Art Institutes Execs Want Insurers To Avert $336M Suit

    Former executives of a holding company that bought now-defunct for-profit colleges Argosy University, South University and The Art Institutes asked an Ohio federal court to force excess insurers to settle receivership claims before the pair are formally accused of leaving a $336 million debt in their wake.

  • April 10, 2024

    House Panel Leaders Say Tax Bill Delay Hurts Small Biz

    The chairman and the ranking member of the House Small Business Committee both urged the Senate on Wednesday to pass the tax bill held up by Republican senators, saying continuing to delay the proposal's package would further burden small businesses.

  • April 10, 2024

    Miami's Plan To Racially Divide Voters Is Illegal, Judge Says

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday ruled that Miami's plan to segregate voting districts based on race is illegal, saying that the gerrymandered redistricting maps approved by the city can't withstand strict scrutiny under the Fourteenth Amendment.

Expert Analysis

  • Defense Attys Must Prep For Imminent AI Crime Enforcement

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    Given recent statements by U.S. Department of Justice officials, white collar practitioners should expect to encounter artificial intelligence in federal criminal enforcement in the near term, even in pending cases, say Jarrod Schaeffer and Scott Glicksman at Abell Eskew.

  • How IRA Unlocks Green Energy Investments For Tribes

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    An Inflation Reduction Act provision going into effect May 10 represents a critical juncture for Native American tribes, offering promising economic opportunity in green energy investment, but requiring a proactive and informed approach when taking advantage of newly available tax incentives, say attorneys at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Planning For Healthcare-Private Equity Antitrust Enforcement

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    U.S. antitrust agency developments could mean potential enforcement actions on healthcare-related acquisitions by private equity funds are on the way, and entities operating in this space should follow a series of practice tips, including early assessment of antitrust risks on both the state and federal level, say Ryan Quillian and John Kendrick at Covington.

  • What Nevada 'Superbasin' Ruling Means For Water Users

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    The Nevada Supreme Court's recent decision in Sullivan v. Lincoln County Water District, affirming that the state can manage multiple predesignated water basins as one "superbasin," significantly broadens the scope of water constraints that project developers in Nevada and throughout the West may need to consider, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Tipsters May Be Key To Financial Regulators' ESG Efforts

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission are looking to whistleblowers to assist their climate and ESG task forces, suggesting insider information could be central to the agencies' enforcement efforts against corporate greenwashing, false investment claims and climate disclosure violations, says John Crutchlow at Youman & Caputo.

  • Opinion

    Why USPTO Should Issue Inherency Guidance Memo

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    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office should issue a new guidance memo in regard to the standard for inherency during the examination process, as the standard is frequently misapplied during prosecution, and consistency of the standard in the USPTO should match that in the federal courts, says Irving Feit at Lucas & Mercanti.

  • 5 Takeaways From SAP's Foreign Bribery Resolutions

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    German software company SAP’s recent settlements with the U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, resolving allegations of foreign bribery, provide insights into government enforcement priorities, and how corporations should structure their compliance programs to reduce liability, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Parsing Chinese Governance On AI-Generated Content

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    As essential risk-mitigation, companies with a China reach should be aware of recent developments in Chinese oversight of AI-generated content, including the latest rulings and regulations as well as the updated ambit for supervisory bodies, say Jet Deng and Ken Dai at Dacheng.

  • Perspectives

    Context Is Everything In Justices' Sentencing Relief Decision

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    In the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Pulsifer v. U.S. decision, limiting the number of drug offenders eligible for sentencing relief, the majority and dissent adopted very different contextual frames for interpreting the meaning of “and” — with the practical impact being that thousands more defendants will be subject to severe mandatory minimums, says Douglas Berman at Moritz College of Law​​​​​​​.

  • Opinion

    The SEC Is Engaging In Regulation By Destruction

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent use of regulation by enforcement against digital assets indicates it's more interested in causing harm to crypto companies than providing guidance to the markets or protecting investors, says J.W. Verret at George Mason University.

  • Series

    NJ Banking Brief: All The Notable Legal Updates In Q1

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    Early 2024 developments in New Jersey financial regulations include new bills that propose regulating some cryptocurrency as securities and protecting banks that serve the cannabis industry, as well as the signing of a data privacy law that could change banks’ responsibility to vet vendors and borrowers, say attorneys at Chiesa Shahinian.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Preparing For Possible Calif. Criminal Antitrust Enforcement

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    Though a recent announcement that the California Attorney General's Office will resume criminal prosecutions in support of its antitrust enforcement may be mere saber-rattling, companies and their counsel should nevertheless be prepared for interactions with the California AG's Antitrust Section that are not limited to civil liability issues, say Dylan Ballard and Lillian Sun at V&E.

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