Public Policy

  • May 14, 2024

    Cos. Ask NY Court To Invalidate 100s Of Pot Licenses

    New York state's beleaguered cannabis oversight agency has been hit with another lawsuit, this one seeking to invalidate hundreds of retail licenses that regulators issued to those most directly affected by the enforcement of marijuana prohibition laws.

  • May 14, 2024

    Trial Averted In Boston Health Agency Harassment Case

    A former Boston health department employee on Tuesday reported that she had settled her claims against the city and a former boss who she says sexually harassed her, scuttling a trial that would have featured several high-profile witnesses, including a federal judge.

  • May 14, 2024

    Insurer Says Miami Retaliation Scheme Not Covered

    An insurer for the City of Miami is seeking reimbursement of $5 million for expenses incurred in defending the city and one of its commissioners against underlying lawsuits alleging political retaliation, telling a Florida federal court that the allegations fall outside the scope of its policies.

  • May 14, 2024

    FTC Cleared To Sue Texas Anesthesia Co., But Not PE Firm

    A Texas federal judge highlighted the limits of the Federal Trade Commission's ability to go after private equity firms accused of anti-competitive "roll-up" strategies, tossing antitrust claims against a private equity firm while preserving monopolization allegations against the anesthesia group the firm created.

  • May 14, 2024

    NIST Finalizes Revised Security Guidelines For Sensitive Info

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology on Tuesday released a final version of revised guidelines for contractors and other entities who handle sensitive unclassified federal information, intended to clarify and streamline those requirements.

  • May 14, 2024

    States Accuse EEOC Of 'Smuggling' Abortion Into PWFA Rule

    Louisiana and Mississippi have sued the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission seeking to invalidate regulations implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, claiming the agency's stance that employers must provide workers accommodations if they get an abortion flouts U.S. Supreme Court precedent and the PWFA itself.

  • May 14, 2024

    'Come On, Counsel!': 11th Circ. Scoffs At Ga. District's Appeal

    The Eleventh Circuit appeared dubious Tuesday that an Atlanta-area school district had standing to appeal a district court's order demanding the Georgia Legislature redraw a map found to be racially gerrymandered, with at least one judge casting aspersions on the school district's motives for pressing the appeal.

  • May 14, 2024

    A Fifth Of Big Cos. Use Tax Transparency Standard, Org. Says

    About a fifth of the largest 1,000 public companies worldwide have voluntarily used a public country-by-country reporting standard created by an international independent standards organization, the nonprofit said Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    10th Circ. Judge Doubts Colo.'s Take On Justices' Gun Ruling

    A Tenth Circuit judge said Tuesday that Colorado was misinterpreting the U.S. Supreme Court's recent gun rights ruling, saying the lack of historical analogues for the state's law raising the buying age made it less likely to pass constitutional muster, not more.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ga. Appeals Court Weighs Validity Of 190-Year-Old Land Grant

    A company seeking to "restore and conserve" approximately 1,000 acres of coastal marshland told Georgia Court of Appeals on Tuesday that the state is attempting to renege on a 190-year-old property grant and take back the land simply because it may soon be worth more than $100 million.

  • May 14, 2024

    Trump Can't Overturn Gag Order In NY Criminal Trial

    A New York state appeals court on Tuesday denied Donald Trump's bid to overturn a gag order intended to stop him from criticizing witnesses and others involved in his ongoing criminal fraud trial.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ariz. Justices Stay 1864 Abortion Ban To Allow For Appeal

    Enforcement of Arizona's 1864 anti-abortion law will remain on hold for at least 90 days as state Attorney General Kris Mayes evaluates whether to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to take up the case.

  • May 14, 2024

    Congressional IP Attorneys Keeping Close Watch On AI

    Top intellectual property attorneys from the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives told a room full of Federal Circuit practitioners on Tuesday that artificial intelligence is the biggest thing to watch within IP law over the next few years.

  • May 14, 2024

    Calif. Grower Fights State's Farmworker Unionization Law

    Wonderful Nurseries LLC is challenging a California state statute that simplified the process for farmworkers like the agricultural company's own to unionize, arguing in a new lawsuit that it's unconstitutional to allow a union to represent workers without a secret-ballot election as long as a majority sign union cards.

  • May 14, 2024

    Feds Dodge Salt Lake City's Suit Over $1B Gondola Plan

    A Utah federal judge on Tuesday dismissed the federal government from a Salt Lake City lawsuit challenging federal approvals of a $1 billion plan to address traffic congestion by building the world's longest gondola.

  • May 14, 2024

    States, Elec. Co-Op Seek To Block EPA Power Plant GHG Rule

    A group of 25 red states and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association asked the D.C. Circuit to block the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing its new power plant greenhouse gas emissions rule while they challenge its legality.

  • May 14, 2024

    DC Circ. Upholds EPA's Renewable Fuel Standards

    A divided D.C. Circuit panel upheld on Tuesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's renewable fuel standards for 2020, 2021 and 2022, rejecting renewable fuel producers' claims the standards are too low, and petroleum refiners' contentions that they are too high.

  • May 14, 2024

    Biden Signs Bipartisan Russian Uranium Products Ban

    A ban on the import of Russian uranium will be phased in beginning in August, following U.S. President Joe Biden's signing of bipartisan legislation.

  • May 14, 2024

    White House Continues To Back Adeel Mangi For 3rd Circ.

    The White House is standing by Adeel Mangi's nomination for the Third Circuit despite the path to confirmation being unclear and the vast opposition he's been facing.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ex-Squire Patton Atty Among Latest Calif. Judges Sworn In

    California got two new appellate court judges and elevated another one on Tuesday morning as a state commission unanimously approved and swore in the three people nominated by Gov. Gavin Newsom, including a onetime Squire Patton Boggs LLP attorney.

  • May 14, 2024

    NY Court System Immune To Spanish-Speaker's Bias Case

    The New York Unified Court System can't be sued in federal court by a Spanish speaker whose limited English language skills allegedly barred him from a program that could have reduced a drug offense's severity, the New York federal court has ruled.

  • May 14, 2024

    Keep It Short, And Other Advice From Fed. Circ. Judges

    Six Federal Circuit judges counseled a packed room of attorneys on Tuesday about the most common ways to ruin their own cases, such as talking too much at oral argument, adding additional citations and attacking judges or opposing counsel.

  • May 14, 2024

    Mexican Mine Labor Row Ruled Outside Trade Pact's Scope

    An international tribunal formed under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement declined to examine if workers at a Mexican mine were denied collective bargaining rights, finding that much of the 17-year dispute had already been decided under now-defunct labor laws.

  • May 14, 2024

    BigLaw Attys Fight Sanctions Over Alleged Judge Shopping

    Attorneys from Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP, Cooley LLP, Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC and prominent LGBTQ rights organizations did not engage in judge shopping when walking away from cases challenging an Alabama law banning certain medical procedures for transgender youth, the lawyers have told an Alabama federal court.

  • May 14, 2024

    Pa. Justices Vexed By DA Funding In Kleinbard Bill Dispute

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court seemed to want more information Tuesday about the source of the former Lancaster County district attorney's "program funds" before wading into whether the DA had the discretion to spend those funds on Kleinbard LLC's legal fees rather than asking his county commissioners for approval.

Expert Analysis

  • What FinCEN Proposed Customer ID Number Change Means

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    The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network's recent request for comment on changing a requirement for banks to collect full Social Security numbers at account sign-up represents an important opportunity for banks to express their preferability, as communicating sensitive information online may carry fraud or cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • How China's IP Proposal Could Affect US Brands' TM Strategy

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    Proposed amendments to China's Trademark Law aimed at improving the application and enforcement processes could make some common U.S. brand protection strategies moot, and may require brand owners to more carefully explain marks' use or nonuse, say attorneys at Neal Gerber.

  • Traversing The Web Of Nonjudicial Grievance Mechanisms

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    Attorneys at Covington provide an overview of how companies can best align their environmental and human rights compliance with "hard-law" requirements like the EU's recently approved Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive while also navigating the complex global network of existing nonjudicial grievance mechanisms.

  • An NYDFS-Regulated Bank's Guide To Proper Internal Audits

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    As certification deadlines for compliance with the New York State Department of Financial Services’ transaction monitoring and cybersecurity regulations loom, lawyers should remember that the NYDFS offers no leeway for best efforts — and should ensure robust auditing and recordkeeping processes for clients, say attorneys at Arnall Golden.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • Opinion

    States Should Follow Federal Lead On Expert Evidence Rules

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    The recently amended Federal Rule of Evidence 702 will help ensure expert testimony in federal courts reflects adequate data and reliable methods properly applied to a given case, and state courts — home to the overwhelming majority of U.S. litigation — should adopt similar changes, says retired attorney Michael Harrington.

  • Opinion

    Post-Moelis Del. Corp. Law Proposal Would Hurt Stockholders

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    The proposed Delaware General Corporation Law amendment in response to the Court of Chancery's recent opinion in West Palm Beach Firefighters' Pension Fund v. Moelis would upend the foundational principle of corporate law holding that directors govern corporations in the interest of stockholders — and the potential harm would be substantial, say attorneys at Block & Leviton.

  • Strategies For Navigating Compliance Monitorships

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    As independent compliance monitorships continue to be a favored tool of the government in resolving corporate enforcement matters, counsel should have a firm grasp on best practices for selecting a monitor, preparing the company and ensuring a productive relationship between the parties, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • An Energy Industry Case Study In Expropriation Risk

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    Andrés Chambouleyron at Berkeley Research breaks down how expropriation risk and damage mitigation calculations vary considerably by different energy sources, and uses Argentina as a case study for how energy investors might protect their interests.

  • Blocked JetBlue-Spirit Deal Illustrates New Antitrust Approach

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent successful block of a merger between JetBlue Airways and Spirit Airlines demonstrates antitrust enforcers’ updated and disparate approach to out-of-market benefits versus out-of-market harms, say Lisa Rumin and Anthony Ferrara at McDermott.

  • At 'SEC Speaks,' A Focus On Rebuilding Trust Amid Criticism

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    At the Practising Law Institute's SEC Speaks conference last week, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission leadership highlighted efforts to rebuild and restore trust in the U.S. capital markets by addressing investor concerns through regulatory measures and enforcement actions, emphasizing the need for cooperation from market participants, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Fla. Banking Brief: All The Notable Legal Updates In Q1

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    Early 2024 developments that could have a notable impact on Florida's finance community include progress on a bill that would substantially revise the state Securities and Investor Protection Act, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's final rule capping late fees for larger credit card issuers, say Benjamin Weinberg and Megan Riley at Leon Cosgrove.

  • The Pros And Cons Of NIST's Proposed March-In Framework

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    Recent comments for and against the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s proposed guidance on march-in rights — which permit the government to seize federally funded patents — highlight how the framework may promote competition, but could also pose a risk to contractors and universities, say Nick Lee and Paul Ragusa at Baker Botts.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

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