Public Policy

  • February 14, 2024

    USDA Says $20M Will Help Tribes Access Climate Market

    Federally recognized tribes and Alaska Native corporations and villages are getting a $20 million bump to broaden their access to emerging climate markets as a way to address ongoing climate change, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Biden's OECD Pick Vows To Warren He'll Avoid Crypto Policy

    A former New York congressman who's been nominated to serve as the U.S. ambassador to a global economic development body has said he'll forgo working on crypto-oriented policy if he's confirmed to the job after Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D.-Mass, expressed concern over his work with cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase.

  • February 14, 2024

    Tax Cap Won't Smoke Philip Morris Credits, NC Justices Hear

    North Carolina's $6 million cigarette export tax cap only limits the credits that can be claimed in a year, not the amount of credit that can be generated, Philip Morris told the state justices Wednesday as it looks to ward off a potential $52.5 million loss.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Nixes NM Schools' Bid For Cancelled Radio Stations

    The Albuquerque Board of Education has no relationship with the person who surrendered two radio station licenses and, therefore, cannot petition the Federal Communications Commission to undo that decision and hand the licenses over to them as "trustees," the agency has declared.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Judge Sends Migrant Busing Suit Back To State Court

    A state court will hear the New York City social services commissioner's $708 million lawsuit seeking to hold charter companies liable for Texas' migrant busing policies, after a New York federal court ruled Wednesday that the case does not raise federal questions.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Must Distribute School IT Funds, Tech Firms Tell DC Circ.

    Two tech companies are calling on the D.C. Circuit to force the Federal Communications Commission to release funds to pay for information technology and broadband services the firms provide in elementary and secondary schools around the country.

  • February 14, 2024

    Legal Org. Backs Lyft In Supreme Court PAGA Fight

    Representative and individual claims brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act are inseparable when it comes to arbitration, a legal organization told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, backing Lyft's challenge to a California state appellate court's decision preserving a former driver's representative claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    FinCEN Head Vows No 'Gotcha' Enforcement Of New Rules

    The director of the U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network said during a Wednesday congressional hearing that the agency is not pursuing "gotcha" enforcement when it comes to companies complying with new rules for reporting their beneficial ownership information.

  • February 14, 2024

    Google Again Targets 'Strategic' Texas AGs' Ad Tech Delays

    Google is hoping a newly appointed special master can finally force a coalition of state attorneys general led by Texas to hand over "fundamental information" it said Tuesday has long been improperly withheld from one of three cases targeting its dominance over display advertising placement auction technology.

  • February 14, 2024

    GOP Senator Wants Confirmation Hearing On Labor Secretary

    Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., called on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions to hold another hearing on the nomination of Julie Su to the position of secretary of labor, arguing that Su's record as acting secretary deserves public scrutiny.

  • February 14, 2024

    San Francisco's Ankle Monitor Rules Put On Hold

    A federal judge in California has halted the San Francisco Sheriff's Office from enforcing rules that forced criminal defendants released pretrial under electronic monitoring to agree to be subjected to warrantless and suspicionless searches at any time and allow their GPS data to be shared among law enforcement agencies, court documents show.

  • February 14, 2024

    NJ Town Looks To Stay 'Historic' $393M PFAS Settlement

    A New Jersey town is looking to pause the final approval of a proposed $393 million settlement between the Garden State and the American arm of Belgian chemical company Solvay over "forever chemical" contamination, arguing the state and its outside counsel have ignored the law in order to settle quickly.

  • February 14, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Ponders Judicial Redistricting

    A state appeals panel on Wednesday questioned whether a Texas House of Representatives candidate has standing to sue Gov. Greg Abbott and the Texas Secretary of State over alleged constitutional violations in the state's judicial districting, asking the plaintiff whether voters can bring suit in appellate districting cases.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ind. Justices Find Eateries Can Be Liable Under Dram Shop Act

    Two restaurant owners could be held liable in a negligence case over a drunken driver who crashed into and killed another man, the Indiana Supreme Court has held, finding the state Dram Shop Act changed common-law liability for businesses that provide alcohol — but did not eliminate it.

  • February 14, 2024

    DOD Boosts Domestic Content Requirements For Contractors

    The U.S. Department of Defense finalized a rule Wednesday implementing the Biden's administration's increased domestic content requirements into its acquisition regulations, including DOD-specific requirements such as exceptions for countries in mutual defense trade deals with the U.S.

  • February 14, 2024

    FTC Seeks Info On 'Powerful Middlemen' Amid Drug Shortages

    The Department of Health and Human Services and the Federal Trade Commission announced Wednesday that they are seeking information on whether legal exemptions for "middlemen" in the generic pharmaceutical market are driving ongoing drug shortages.

  • February 14, 2024

    House Rep. Green Plans Retirement After Mayorkas Fight

    Rep. Mark Green, R-Tenn., chair of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, said Wednesday evening he will not seek reelection, an announcement that comes one day after he led the impeachment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary.

  • February 14, 2024

    DHS Warns Of Reduced Operations With Budget Shortfall

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is warning it may have to pare back border security initiatives and removal procedures, while green card and asylum backlogs worsen, if Congress doesn't provide additional funding, per a Wednesday email to Law360.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Besieged' Melamine Biz Calls For Tariffs On 6 Countries

    A Louisiana chemical company saying it's "besieged" by foreign competition pressed U.S. trade officials Wednesday to investigate imports of a plastic compound, alleging that producers from six countries were using unfair trade practices to squeeze it out.

  • February 14, 2024

    Enviro Orgs Planning EPA Suit Over Phosphate-Mining Waste

    A coalition of conservation, public health and environmental justice groups told the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency they plan to sue it for failing to respond to a 3-year-old petition asking for stronger regulations governing toxic and radioactive phosphogypsum waste generated by the fertilizer industry.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ill. Judge Says Rezoning Of Historic Hotel Damaged Developer

    An Illinois federal judge found that the city of Chicago improperly zoned the historic Pittsfield Building for strictly residential use not long after agreeing with the former owner and developer to zone the property for a new hotel.

  • February 14, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Asks Justices To Pass On Immunity Issue

    Special counsel Jack Smith urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to reject former President Donald Trump's request for a stay of his federal election interference case, arguing that there's no merit to Trump's "radical claim" he is immune from prosecution, and that the public deserves a prompt verdict.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-US Diplomat Pleads Not Guilty To Spying For Cuba

    A diplomat who served on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration and as U.S. ambassador to Bolivia entered a not guilty plea Wednesday to charges that he secretly acted as an agent of the Cuban government for decades.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Suggests LaPierre Owes Millions As NRA Trial Ends

    New York state attorneys on Wednesday scrutinized former National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre's testimony that he rectified all his improper spending by repaying $1 million to the gun group, pointing out that LaPierre racked up nearly $13 million in charges for private jet travel alone.

Expert Analysis

  • What Last Year's Trends Mean For Compliance In 2024

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    In 2023, compliance teams grappled with questions related to artificial intelligence, data analytics and corporate culture — trends that are likely to become even more prominent in the year to come, says Hui Chen at Ropes & Gray.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • The Year Ahead In Foreign Investment And National Security

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    In 2024, expect the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, already at the forefront of addressing national security threats, to increase monitoring and enforcement related to outbound investment, focus on supply chain resilience in nondefense sectors, and heighten oversight of agricultural transactions, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • Unpacking The Proposed Production Tax Credit Regulations

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    Recently proposed tax regulations for claiming the U.S. clean-energy manufacturers' production credit under Internal Revenue Code Section 45X are less stringent than many had feared but fail to define a fundamental eligibility requirement, say Casey August and Jared Sanders at Morgan Lewis.

  • Compliance Risk After SEC Warning Against 'AI Washing'

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has begun looking into the way public companies disclose how they use artificial intelligence to investors and it is likely to become an enforcement priority, meaning companies and their compliance programs should take steps now to avoid regulatory sanctions and shareholder lawsuits, say attorneys at Bracewell.

  • Texas Banking Brief: All The Notable Legal Updates In Q4

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    Among the most noteworthy developments in the Texas banking sphere in the last quarter of 2023 were the Texas Department of Banking's extension of the state banking commissioner's authority, a recommendation to implement an updated ransomware self-assessment tool, and ongoing litigation in the state involving the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, says Patrick Hanchey at Alston & Bird.

  • SDNY Ruling Highlights Fed's Broad Master Account Power

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    In denying a Puerto Rican bank’s recent motion for injunction against the New York Fed, a New York federal court went beyond the specifics of the case in holding that financial institutions have no statutory right to a master account with a Federal Reserve bank, emphasizing the Fed’s unilateral discretion in these matters, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Sex Harassment Arbitration Exemption: Devil Is In The Date

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    A Federal Arbitration Act amendment that exempts workplace sexual harassment claims from arbitration is muddled in ongoing confusion about its chronological reach — and as many such cases begin to run up against applicable statutes of limitations, the clock is ticking for claimants to bring their actions in court, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • Food And Beverage Policy Trends Cos. Should Track In 2024

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    The list of legal issues food and beverage companies should watch out for in 2024 include the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Human Foods Program, the Food Safety and Inspection Service’s salmonella proposal, Proposition 12 and more, say Bob Hibbert and Amaru Sánchez at Wiley.

  • Digging Into The Debate On FDA's Proposed Lab Test Rule

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    A proposed 10-word amendment from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration represents a sea change in device regulation as it would summarily end decades of FDA enforcement discretion for laboratory developed tests, and the public comments offer some insight into the future of this long-running saga, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • How 2023 Shaped Drug And Medical Device Legal Trends

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    2023 brought a number of positive developments for the life sciences industry, including great trial and multidistrict litigation outcomes, but also some heavy-handed regulations and other concerning developments that lay the groundwork for significant litigation, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Cybersecurity Issues For Financial Industry To Track In 2024

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    In 2024 financial institutions will confront new federal, state and industry regulations around cybersecurity that require additional procedures, enhanced proactive security measures, and timely disclosure of security incidents, say Alex Koskey and Matt White at Baker Donelson.

  • 5 Recent Developments Family Offices Are Watching In 2024

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    Although family offices have long been exempt from many of the more onerous regulations and reporting requirements governing U.S. investment advisers and asset managers, recent amendments to federal rules will have an impact on how family offices invest and operate in 2024, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • After Headwinds, 2024 May See Offshore Wind Momentum

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    Despite skyrocketing raw material costs, conflicting state and federal policies, and other setbacks for the offshore wind sector in 2023, the industry appears poised for growth in the coming year, with improving economics, more flexible procurement procedures and increasing legislative support, say Emily Huggins Jones and Ben Cowan at Locke Lord.

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