Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • May 07, 2024

    Hospital Can't Force Nurse's Retaliation Suit Into Arbitration

    A Texas appellate court said Tuesday that a former nurse does not have to arbitrate claims that she was fired after reporting that a patient slapped her buttock, stating that a recently enacted federal law barring sexual assault-related claims from out-of-court resolutions applies to her case.

  • May 07, 2024

    Appeals Court Won't Block Live Nation Astroworld Deposition

    A Texas appeals court declined to block the deposition of Live Nation's CEO and president on Tuesday as it continues to weigh whether the first trial in litigation stemming from the deadly Astroworld crowd crush will be paused pending the resolution of an appeal by Apple.

  • May 07, 2024

    Panera To Nix 'Charged' Drink At Center Of Death Suits

    Panera Bread Co. will soon no longer serve its "Charged Lemonade," the caffeinated drink at the center of two lawsuits that claim the restaurant chain is liable for the wrongful death of two patrons.

  • May 07, 2024

    Dave Chappelle Attacker Sues Hollywood Bowl Over Injuries

    A Los Angeles County man who says he was beat "ruthlessly" by security after he rushed the stage and tackled Dave Chappelle at a Hollywood Bowl show in 2022 to protest the comedian's "discriminatory" jokes has sued the venue for negligent security and battery.

  • May 07, 2024

    Russian Charged Over $100M LockBit Ransomware Scheme

    Federal prosecutors said Tuesday they have charged a Russian national with founding and heading the prolific ransomware group LockBit, which is accused of stealing more than $100 million from its victims.

  • May 07, 2024

    3rd Circ. Unsure Miss. Law Saves Kavanaugh Classmate's Suit

    Weighing whether New York or Mississippi law controls a libel lawsuit that Justice Brett Kavanaugh's former classmate filed against The Huffington Post could be moot if neither state's law offers an extension for refiling claims dismissed for lack of personal jurisdiction, a Third Circuit panel suggested Tuesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    Yale Can View Deposition In Fraudulent Insemination Suit

    Entities tied to Yale University can see a transcript of a deposition taken from a retired fertility doctor accused in two court actions of secretly using his own sperm for inseminations in the 1980s, as the school tries to shield itself from possible litigation, a Connecticut judge ruled Tuesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    7th Circ. Ruling Imperils Anonymity In NCAA, Netflix Cases

    Anonymous plaintiffs suing the NCAA and Netflix in separate cases in Indiana federal court must explain why they should be allowed to keep their identities hidden following a recent Seventh Circuit ruling that established "a stringent standard" relating to anonymity, a magistrate judge has ruled.

  • May 07, 2024

    Tennis Org. Ordered To Pay $9M For Sexual Abuse Negligence

    The U.S. Tennis Association has been ordered to pay $9 million to tennis pro Kylie McKenzie, who has waged a legal battle against the organization over its failure to shield her from sexual abuse at the hands of her coach at a Florida training center.

  • May 07, 2024

    Birth Control Cos. Can't Dodge Conn. Injury Suit, Court Told

    An Illinois woman who sued after her Filshie Clip birth control device migrated inside of her and "wreaked havoc on her body" has urged a state court not to let the manufacturers of the device and the seller's parent companies dodge her claims.

  • May 06, 2024

    Hospital Hits Back At Kowalskis' Bid For Sanctions

    Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital urged a Florida court on Friday to reject a sanctions bid by the attorneys for Maya Kowalski — who won a $213 million verdict against the hospital and was the subject of the Netflix documentary "Take Care of Maya" — against the hospital's attorneys, arguing that the request for the court to refer them to the Florida Bar is improper.

  • May 06, 2024

    Sikorsky's Forum Stance In Crash Suit Loses Teeth, Court Told

    A member of the Canadian Armed Forces has decided not to pursue "bystander claims" against Connecticut-based Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. and Lockheed Martin entities over a fatal helicopter crash off the coast of Greece, plaintiffs told a Pennsylvania federal court, noting that the development should pare down a forum dispute plaguing the matter. 

  • May 06, 2024

    Monsanto Says Ruling Undoes $438M School PCB Loss

    Monsanto said Friday that a $438 million judgment in a polychlorinated biphenyls poisoning case at a Washington school should be thrown out, citing a recent state appellate court ruling undoing a $185 million jury verdict in a similar case involving chemical-caused illnesses at the same school campus.

  • May 06, 2024

    Ex-JetBlue Attendant Can't Have Neurological Exam Recorded

    A New York federal judge said Monday that a former flight attendant for JetBlue Airways Corp. who said she suffered brain injuries from being exposed to toxic fumes can't have a neurological examination recorded, saying she hadn't established special conditions that would warrant it.

  • May 06, 2024

    Fla. Judge Tosses Suit To Remove Miami Official From Office

    A Florida state court judge on Monday threw out a lawsuit brought by two real estate developers seeking to unseat a Miami commissioner from office over civil rights violations, citing a lack of standing to sue because they aren't residents of the city.

  • May 06, 2024

    Warranty Claims Trimmed From Bone Graft Tuberculosis Suit

    A North Carolina federal judge has thrown out breach of warranty claims against three companies in a suit alleging their bone repair product gave a woman tuberculosis, saying it's subject to a state law blocking warranty liability for services involving human tissue.

  • May 06, 2024

    UChicago Can't Ditch Data Sharing Privacy Claim

    A University of Chicago Medical Center patient accusing the hospital of illegally sharing her and other patients' identifying information with Meta can pursue her claims that the info sharing constitutes a federal wiretap violation, an Illinois federal judge said.

  • May 06, 2024

    5th Circ. Revives Airline Workers' Hearing-Loss Suit

    A pair of flight attendants seeking to hold Boeing liable over hearing loss they suffered due to an aircraft's allegedly faulty smoke alarm have successfully convinced a Fifth Circuit panel to allow them to refile their case, bringing their claims back from the brink almost three years after the appeals court tossed them.

  • May 06, 2024

    Party Co.'s Trackless Train Claims Not Covered, Judge Says

    An underwriter doesn't owe coverage to a Las Vegas-based party rental business for claims stemming from an overturned trackless train at a birthday party, a Nevada federal court has ruled, saying the company failed to maintain its business license at the time of the accident as required by the policy.

  • May 06, 2024

    Rocker Tommy Lee Nixes Helicopter Sex Assault Suit, For Now

    A California judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit accusing musician Tommy Lee of groping a woman in 2003, finding the claims cannot be carried under a statute that opened a lookback window for sexual assault claims that may otherwise be time-barred, but granted leave to amend the complaint.

  • May 06, 2024

    Convicted Ga. Sheriff Hit With Civil Rights Suit From Detainee

    Former Georgia Sheriff Victor Hill, who was convicted in 2022 of violating his detainees' civil rights by leaving them strapped to a chair for hours at a time, was hit with a federal lawsuit Friday by an alleged victim of Hill's methods who testified against him in his criminal trial.

  • May 06, 2024

    Calif. Doctors Can't Escape Med Mal Atty's Defamation Suit

    A California appeals court has said two California doctors cannot escape a defamation suit over an allegedly defamatory website they created about a malpractice attorney whom they'd had a fee dispute with, denying an anti-SLAPP motion because the language the lawyer identified in his amended complaint was not protected activity.

  • May 06, 2024

    Data Privacy Co. Wants Personal Info Suits In NJ State Court

    Most of the recently moved lawsuits alleging violations of a New Jersey judicial privacy law should be moved back to state court since the plaintiffs and defendants reside in the Garden State, the data privacy company behind the first-of-their-kind cases has told a New Jersey federal judge.

  • May 06, 2024

    Nonprofit Dodges Punitive Damages Over Child's Death

    An Ohio state court jury did not find any malice in Catholic Charities Corp.'s actions before a developmentally disabled 5-year-old, whom one of its former workers allegedly lied about checking on, was found in a shallow grave, meaning the nonprofit does not have to pay punitive damages for the boy's death.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ala. High Court Won't Rethink Decision On Frozen Embryos

    The Alabama Supreme Court on Friday refused to revisit its February decision finding that frozen embryos count as children, a first-of-its-kind decision that has been received as potentially ruinous for in vitro fertilization services in the Yellowhammer State.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Strict Duty To Indemnify Ruling Bucks Recent Trend

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    A South Carolina federal court's recent decision that it lacked subject matter jurisdiction to decide an insurer's duty to indemnify prior to the finding of insured liability sharply diverges from the more nuanced or multipronged standards established by multiple circuit courts, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • NC TikTok Order Holds Lessons On Handling State AG Probes

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    Earlier this month, a North Carolina appeals court compelled TikTok to give the state attorney general information relating to 98,000 recorded Zoom meetings, reminding companies that successful civil litigation strategies may have the opposite effect in the state or regulatory investigation context, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • How States Vary On The Fireman's Rule And Its Applicability

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    A recent decision by the Indiana Court of Appeals, reviving a firefighter’s suit, is illustrative of changes in the application and interpretation by state courts and legislatures of the Fireman’s Rule, which bans first responders from recovering for injuries sustained on the job, says Shea Feagin at Swift Currie.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • The Section 230 Immunity Provision Debate Continues

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    The Fifth Circuit last month voted in Doe v. Snap Inc. not to reconsider en banc its decade-old interpretation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which generally allows websites to police objectionable content as they see fit — but a growing number of judges appear motivated to further limit the scope of its immunity, say Jordan Rice and Caleb Hayes-Deats at MoloLamken.

  • Opinion

    Why Justices Should Protect Public From Bump Stocks

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    In Garland v. Cargill, the U.S. Supreme Court has the opportunity to restore the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' rule banning bump stocks — thus preserving Congress' original intent to protect the American people from particularly dangerous firearms, says Douglas Letter at Brady United Against Gun Violence.

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