Ohio

  • December 14, 2023

    Real Estate Investor Cops To $165M Mortgage Fraud Scheme

    A New York real estate investor admitted to engaging in a multiyear conspiracy to fraudulently obtain $165 million in loans to purchase multifamily and commercial properties.

  • December 13, 2023

    Judge Blocks NCAA Rule Restricting Athlete Transfers

    A West Virginia federal judge on Wednesday placed a temporary hold on an NCAA rule requiring certain student athletes who transferred schools to wait a year before competing in games, marking a significant early victory in the antitrust lawsuit lodged by seven state attorneys general.

  • December 13, 2023

    Jazz, Express Scripts Beat Calif. Overcharge Suit, For Now

    A California federal judge tossed, for now, proposed class action claims that Jazz Pharmaceuticals PLC and Express Scripts Inc. illegally boosted sales of two medications by funneling money through a nonprofit to fund patient copays, saying the claims recovery company suing hasn't shown it's been injured.

  • December 13, 2023

    Judge Refuses To Undo Cert. Of Trucker OT Class Over Clark

    A trucking company's bid to apply a new, stricter Sixth Circuit standard for collective action certification in wage and hour cases hit a wall, with a Kentucky federal judge ruling that notices to potential opt-in plaintiffs already were sent and the new test doesn't require restarting this crucial part of the process.

  • December 13, 2023

    3 Appellate Rulings Discrimination Attys Should Know

    The U.S. Supreme Court grabbed headlines in employment discrimination law this year, but circuit courts made waves as well, with decisions on religious carveouts to bias law and what a worker has to endure to pursue a discrimination case. Here's a look at three appeals court decisions from 2023 that discrimination attorneys should know.

  • December 13, 2023

    3 Law Firm Practice Areas That Gained Popularity In 2023

    As new and emerging legal concerns plagued clients, large law firms sprang into action in 2023, launching new practice groups to accommodate the increased need.

  • December 13, 2023

    Michigan's Biggest Decisions Of 2023

    Michigan courts this year handed down rulings that should revitalize the plaintiffs' bar, shake up how the car capital of the world does business and serve as a reminder that without enough evidence to back them up, nine-figure jury verdicts can be undone. Law360 looks back at some of the decisions that made waves in Michigan this year.

  • December 13, 2023

    Top State And Local Tax Policies Of 2023

    In 2023, most state treasuries were fuller than anticipated and state lawmakers faced the challenges of rising property taxes and booming housing costs. Here, Law360 looks at some of the top trends in state and local tax policy this year.

  • December 12, 2023

    6th Circ. Judge Questions Nissan's 'All-or-Nothing' Approach

    A Sixth Circuit panel on Tuesday wondered how to divvy up fault as it considered Nissan's quest to make its brake supplier pay for a $24 million jury verdict awarded after a crash that killed three people, with one judge questioning Nissan's "all-or-nothing" approach to liability.

  • December 12, 2023

    Lawmakers Say Pharmacies Not Protecting Customer Data

    A trio of lawmakers asked Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra to improve federal health privacy regulations to better protect customers' prescriptions and other health records held by pharmacies after a committee inquiry found that law enforcement agencies obtain the prescription records of thousands of Americans without a warrant each year.

  • December 12, 2023

    Firefighter Wants Full 6th Circ. To Rehear Class PFAS Suit

    A former Ohio firefighter is asking the full Sixth Circuit to rehear his suit alleging 3M Co. and others manufactured and sold products with so-called forever chemicals after a panel vacated his class certification and told a district court to throw out his "ambitious" claims.

  • December 12, 2023

    Ohio Panel Topples Pot Dispensary's Victory In Lease Fight

    An Ohio appeals court ruled a medical marijuana dispensary failed to properly renew its lease for an additional three years, siding with a landlord who was blocked from evicting the tenant.

  • December 12, 2023

    Warren, Sanders Ask FTC To Block Kroger-Albertsons Deal

    U.S. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont are among a group of lawmakers asking the Federal Trade Commission to prevent The Kroger Co.'s proposed $24.6 billion acquisition of Albertsons Cos. Inc., according to a letter published Tuesday. 

  • December 12, 2023

    Jury Awards Ex-OSU Dentist $600K In Retaliation Suit

    A federal jury handed a $600,000 win to a former faculty member who accused Ohio State University and the dean of its dentistry school of threatening her job and restricting her clinical privileges after she participated in an investigation into a senior faculty member's misconduct.

  • December 11, 2023

    Mich. AG Turns To Shakespeare To Block Enbridge Appeal

    Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel quoted "Romeo and Juliet" in her bid to shut down a natural gas and oil pipeline that crosses the Great Lakes, telling the Sixth Circuit that Enbridge Energy LP is playing word games to support its late transfer of the lawsuit to federal court.

  • December 11, 2023

    Healthcare-Focused SPAC Gardiner Acquisition Calls It Quits

    Blank-check company Gardiner Healthcare Acquisitions Corp plans to liquidate and return money to its investors, the company said in a statement Monday.

  • December 11, 2023

    GOP Lawmakers Urge Raimondo To Nix Vietnam Review

    Three Republican senators on Monday urged the head of the U.S. Department of Commerce to suspend the agency's review of Vietnam's nonmarket economy status, claiming the process is being rushed toward a reversal that could hurt American companies.

  • December 11, 2023

    Mich. AG Asks 6th Circ. To Deny Christian Health Clinic Appeal

    A Christian health clinic's fear of prosecution under a Michigan anti-discrimination law is unfounded and speculative, state Attorney General Dana Nessel said Friday as she urged the Sixth Circuit to reject the group's appeal.

  • December 11, 2023

    6th Circ. Says Mayan Woman's Abuse Wasn't Just 'Personal'

    The Sixth Circuit faulted the immigration appeals board for denying asylum to a Mayan woman who claims to have fled abusive in-laws, ordering it to reconsider whether the in-laws could have abused her because of her Indigenous customs and beliefs.

  • December 11, 2023

    Justices Vacate Vax Mandate Injunctions As Moot

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday lifted blocks on President Joe Biden's COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal employees and U.S. Air Force members, instructing the Fifth and Sixth Circuits to vacate the injunctions as moot since the administration had rescinded the mandates.

  • December 11, 2023

    Cleveland Drops Drug Tests For Pot For Some Job Applicants

    The city of Cleveland will no longer drug test job applicants for cannabis, save for positions identified as safety or security sensitive and those that fall under the Ohio Department of Transportation.

  • December 08, 2023

    Circuit-By-Circuit Guide To 2023's Most Memorable Moments

    A former BigLaw partner in his 30s made history by joining a preeminent circuit court, a former BigLaw partner in his 50s made waves by leaving the largest circuit, and a former chemist in her 90s made enemies by resisting a probe on the most specialized circuit. That's a small sample of the intrigue that flourished in 2023 throughout the federal appellate system, where diversity bloomed and controversy abounded.

  • December 08, 2023

    Procter & Gamble Sold Metamucil Containing Lead, Suit Says

    The Procter & Gamble Co. has been hit with a proposed class action in New York federal court alleging it falsely claims its Metamucil fiber supplement is healthy when it contains dangerous amounts of lead and added sugar.

  • December 08, 2023

    Ex-Worker Says Western & Southern Robbed Her Of $1M

    Western & Southern Financial Group Inc. allegedly fired a 73-year-old insurance sales representative based on trumped-up misconduct allegations in order to get out of paying her the more than $1 million she had earned from a company retention incentive program upon her retirement, a new suit says.

  • December 08, 2023

    Off The Bench: NCAA Pay Plan, Title IX Claims, Graffiti Smear

    In this week's Off The Bench, the NCAA proposes opening the vaults, female athletes accuse the University of Oregon of unequal treatment, and a former college hockey player claims he was wrongly labeled as antisemitic. If you were on the sidelines over the past week, Law360 is here to clue you in on the biggest sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

Expert Analysis

  • Rethinking In-Office Attendance For Associate Retention

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    The hybrid office attendance model doesn't work for all employees, but it does for many — and balancing these two groups is important for associate retention and maintaining a BigLaw firm culture that supports all attorneys, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Perspectives

    A New HOPE For Expunging State-Level Cannabis Convictions

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    As states across the U.S. legalize cannabis, individuals with related convictions face hurdles to expunging their records due to outdated record-keeping systems — but the recently introduced HOPE Act would remedy this by providing grant funding to state and local governments, says Rep. Dave Joyce, R-Ohio.

  • Opinion

    ALI, Bar Groups Need More Defense Engagement For Balance

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    The American Law Institute and state bar committees have a special role in the development of the law — but if they do not do a better job of including attorneys from the defense bar, they will come to be viewed as special interest advocacy groups, says Mark Behrens at Shook Hardy.

  • Murdaugh Trials Offer Law Firms Fraud Prevention Reminders

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    As the fraud case against Alex Murdaugh continues to play out, the evidence and narrative presented at his murder trial earlier this year may provide lessons for law firms on implementing robust internal controls that can detect and prevent similar kinds of fraud, say Travis Casner and Helga Zauner at Weaver and Tidwell.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Rule 23

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    A recent Sixth Circuit decision in Fox v. Saginaw County that rejected the common attempt to use Rule 23 to sidestep Article III's standing limitations shows antitrust defendants' success in challenging standing will rest on happenstance without more clarity from the Supreme Court — which no litigant should be comfortable with, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

  • Firm Tips For Helping New Lawyers Succeed Post-Pandemic

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    Ten steps can help firms significantly enhance the experience of attorneys who started their careers in the coronavirus pandemic era, including facilitating opportunities for cross-firm connection, which can ultimately help build momentum for business development, says Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners.

  • Opinion

    6th Circ. Judge Correctly ID'd ERISA Civil Procedure Conflict

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    While the Sixth Circuit in Tranbarger v. Lincoln Life & Annuity recently affirmed a ruling that denied the plaintiff's disability benefits, one judge's concurrence should be commended for arguing that adjudication of such Employee Retirement Income Security Act cases fundamentally contradicts the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Prepping Your Business Ahead Of Affirmative Action Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming ruling on whether race should play a role in college admissions could potentially end affirmative action, and companies will need a considered approach to these circumstances that protects their brand power and future profits, and be prepared to answer tough questions, say Nadine Blackburn at United Minds and Eric Blankenbaker at Weber Shandwick.

  • Tackling Judge-Shopping Concerns While Honoring Localism

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    As the debate continues over judge-shopping and case assignments in federal court, policymakers should look to a hybrid model that preserves the benefits of localism for those cases that warrant it, while preventing the appearance of judge-shopping for cases of a more national or widespread character, says Joshua Sohn at the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Perspectives

    How Attorneys Can Help Combat Anti-Asian Hate

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    Amid an exponential increase in violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, unique obstacles stand in the way of accountability and justice — but lawyers can effect powerful change by raising awareness, offering legal representation, advocating for victims’ rights and more, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Opinion

    Congress Needs To Enact A Federal Anti-SLAPP Statute

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    Although many states have passed statutes meant to prevent individuals or entities from filing strategic lawsuits against public participation, other states have not, so it's time for Congress to enact a federal statute to ensure that free speech and petitioning rights are uniformly protected nationwide in federal court, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • FLRA Ruling May Show Need For Congressional Clarification

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    With its recent decision in The Ohio Adjutant General's Department v. Federal Labor Relations Authority, the U.S. Supreme Court took a somewhat behavioral approach in determining that the guard acted as a federal agency in hiring dual-status technicians — suggesting the need for ultimate clarification from Congress, says Marick Masters at Wayne State University.

  • Some Client Speculations On AI And The Law Firm Biz Model

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    Generative artificial intelligence technologies will put pressure on the business of law as it is structured currently, but clients may end up with more price certainty for legal services, and lawyers may spend more time being lawyers, says Jonathan Cole at Melody Capital.

  • Cos. Shouldn't Alter Noncompete, Severance Agreements Yet

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    Two recent actions from the Federal Trade Commission and the National Labor Relations Board have sought to ban noncompete agreements and curtail severance agreements, respectively, but employers should hold off on making any changes to those forms while the agencies' actions are challenged, say attorneys at Herbert Smith.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Approaching Digital Assets In Discovery

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    The booming growth of cryptocurrency and non-fungible tokens has made digital assets relevant in many legal disputes but also poses several challenges for discovery, so lawyers must garner an understanding of the technology behind these assets, the way they function, and how they're held, says Brett Sager at Ehrenstein Sager.

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