Immigration

  • April 15, 2024

    Feds Tells Justices US Citizen Lacks Interest In Spouse's Visa

    The U.S. State Department told the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday that U.S. citizens don't have a constitutional right to know why consular officers deny their spouses' visas, saying that any requirement to provide an explanation would raise national security concerns.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Revive 7 Immigration Appeals After Hardship Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday granted certiorari in seven cases and remanded all of them in light of its recent ruling that circuit courts have the authority to review hardship determinations in immigration appeals.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Challenge To Wash. Voting Rights Law

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to consider whether Washington's voting rights law made race the predominant factor in redistricting, in a case involving a rural county with a slim majority of Latino voters.

  • April 12, 2024

    GEO Seeks Wash. ICE Detention Law's Permanent End

    Private prison operator GEO Group Inc. told a Washington federal court judge that the fact the court found parts of a law aimed at improving private prison standards unconstitutional meant the court should permanently bar the law's enforcement.

  • April 12, 2024

    Berry Appleman Faces Disability Bias Suit By Ex-Tech Lead

    Global immigration law firm Berry Appleman & Leiden is facing a disability discrimination suit filed Friday in Texas federal court by its former software tech lead, who says the firm set him up to fail when he sought reasonable accommodations for a coding project due to side effects from his medication.

  • April 12, 2024

    House To Retry Spy Bill After Warrant Measure Fails By 1 Vote

    The U.S. House of Representatives on Friday voted to reauthorize government surveillance of foreigners without warrants, only to have a Florida Republican call for a reconsideration vote for Monday to require warrants for spying on Americans' communications caught up in the surveillance.

  • April 12, 2024

    Split 6th Circ. Orders BIA To Rethink Iraqi Man's Asylum Bid

    A divided panel of the Sixth Circuit has published an opinion ruling that the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals did not properly consider new evidence in an Iraqi man's asylum petition under the Convention Against Torture, with one judge dissenting to say the board did not abuse its discretion.

  • April 12, 2024

    SEC Says Developer Pulled EB-5 Funds From Nursing Homes

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission accused a Las Vegas developer of using $10 million raised by overseas investors hoping to immigrate to the U.S. to pay down a loan for a project unconnected to their immigration applications.

  • April 12, 2024

    Feds Say Texas' Razor Wire Blocks Immigration Enforcement

    The Biden administration urged a Texas federal court to toss the Lone Star State's lawsuit to maintain barbed wire fencing along the border with Mexico, saying the barrier prevents border agents from arresting individuals crossing unlawfully and providing emergency aid to migrants in distress.

  • April 11, 2024

    Iowa Makes Illegal U.S. Reentry A State Crime

    Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds has signed into law a bill that will let state police arrest individuals suspected of having entered the country illegally, raising the prospect of another legal battle over the federal government's jurisdiction over immigration affairs.

  • April 11, 2024

    Black Workers, Fish Farm Settle Claims Of Migrant Hiring Bias

    Black farmers and a Mississippi-based fish farm have agreed to settle claims that the farm pushed out the U.S. citizen farmers in favor of Mexican migrant workers, they announced to a Mississippi federal court on Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ga. Judge Tosses Immigrant Voting Rights Suit Mid-Trial

    As attorneys for the Georgia Secretary of State's office prepared to mount their defense Thursday against a lawsuit challenging the legality of how the state adds newly naturalized citizens to its voter rolls, an Atlanta federal judge instead announced she was dismissing the case mid-trial.

  • April 11, 2024

    Texas Staffing Co. Settles Noncitizen Bias Claims

    A Texas staffing company settled the federal government's claims that it discriminated against a man by requiring he show his green card to prove he can work in the U.S., the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Feds Agree To Settle Damages Over 2018 Migrant Separations

    The Biden administration is on track to settle two lawsuits from families that alleged serious harm from a Trump-era policy that resulted in children and parents being separated at the southern border, according to Arizona federal court filings.

  • April 10, 2024

    Dems Introduce Bill To Codify Policy Barring Judge Shopping

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., along with 37 other Democratic and two independent senators, introduced legislation on Wednesday to codify the new Judicial Conference of the United States policy against judge shopping after pushback from Republicans and a Texas court.

  • April 10, 2024

    Deported Man Can't Undo Fraud Conviction After Feds' Error

    A deported Nigerian national who confessed to fraud on promises that prosecutors would submit a letter to immigration authorities supporting his deportation defense couldn't convince the Eighth Circuit to toss his guilty plea after prosecutors mistakenly disavowed the letter.

  • April 10, 2024

    Cleaning Co. To Pay $400K In H-2B Workers' Exploitation Suit

    Mexican guest workers and a cleaning company that recruited them to work at a Colorado luxury hotel asked a federal judge on Wednesday to grant initial approval of a $400,000 settlement on claims that the company committed myriad wage and visa law violations and threatened to deport workers who complained.

  • April 10, 2024

    House Rejects Renewal Of Contentious FISA Authority

    The House of Representatives on Wednesday effectively rejected a bill to renew a contentious foreign surveillance authority, after 19 Republican lawmakers refused to back the legislation following criticism from former President Donald Trump.

  • April 10, 2024

    Activists Can't Show LexisNexis Violated Ill. Consumer Law

    Activists were unable to convince an Illinois federal court that LexisNexis Risk Solutions Inc. had violated an Illinois consumer protection law by collecting and selling personal information to immigration and other law enforcement agencies, with the court saying the data was not private.

  • April 09, 2024

    Contractor Says Feds Are Blocking Border Wall Settlement Payout

    A construction contractor wants to intervene in litigation over the Biden administration's diversion of border wall funds, saying the federal government has invoked a recent injunction in the case to stymie the company's attempt to recoup lost construction costs.

  • April 09, 2024

    5th Circ. Seeks More Info Before Ruling On Texas Arrest Law

    The Fifth Circuit wants to look into instances in which Congress statutorily allowed the federal government to seek injunctive relief against states before deciding on a district court injunction blocking a controversial Texas law allowing state officers to arrest unauthorized immigrants.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ex-Haitian Mayor Can't Nix Mass. Jury's $15.5M Torture Verdict

    A Boston federal judge has refused to toss a $15.5 million civil verdict finding a former Haitian mayor responsible for torture and extrajudicial violence against rival political party members.

  • April 09, 2024

    Lack Of Evidence Kills Pupuseria's Bid For H-2B Line Cooks

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board affirmed the rejection of a California pupuseria's request to hire two line cooks under the H-2B temporary foreign worker program, finding that a certifying officer correctly determined that the business failed to show it had a seasonal need for the employees.

  • April 09, 2024

    Challengers To H-2A Wage Rule Denied Extra Discovery

    A federal judge has refused to let agricultural businesses gather more information on the decision-making behind new H-2A agricultural worker minimum wages, rejecting claims that more discovery was warranted in light of a September order allowing the wages to take hold.

  • April 08, 2024

    11th Circ. Wants To Brief Standing In DHS Parole Policy Suits

    The Eleventh Circuit on Monday directed Florida and the federal government to offer their perspectives on whether a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision reviving the Biden administration's immigration enforcement priorities bears on the state's ability to mount a legal challenge to the administration's migrant parole programs.

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Expert Analysis

  • CFPB, DOJ Signal Focus On Fair Lending To Immigrants

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    New joint guidance from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the U.S. Department of Justice effectively broadens the scope of protected classes under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act to include immigration status, indicating a significant shift in regulatory scrutiny, say Alex McFall and Leslie Sowers at Husch Blackwell.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Cos. Must Adapt To Calif. Immigration Data Privacy Law

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    California’s recently signed A.B. 947 expands the California Consumer Privacy Act and brings the state in line with other comprehensive privacy laws that address immigration status, meaning companies should make any necessary updates to their processes and disclosures, say Kate Lucente and Matt Dhaiti at DLA Piper.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • Consider Immigration Issues When Hiring Int'l Medical Grads

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    As health systems across the U.S. struggle to meet patient demand, recruiting international medical graduates can help alleviate some strain, although sorting through the requisite visa processes may require some extra legwork depending on the qualifications of both the graduate and the employer, say Nora Katz and Vinh Duong at Holland & Knight.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Key Employer Takeaways From USCIS' H-1B Visa Proposal

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    There are several steps employers can take, like reviewing job descriptions and assessing cap-exempt eligibility, to be well positioned for the sweeping changes that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services proposes to implement next year to improve the H-1B visa program, say Brian Coughlin and Angelica Ochoa at Fisher Phillips.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Lost In A Maze Of USCIS Policy On Child Immigration Status

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    A succession of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services policy updates, erroneous denials and conflicting messages have limited practitioners' ability to know which clients qualify under a federal law that protects children from aging out of their parents' immigrant petitions, say Jeffrey Galkin and Anna Stepanova at Murthy Law Firm.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

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