Government Contracts

  • November 30, 2023

    NY Tribe Sues To Stop Sewage Pipeline On Wildlife Refuge

    The Tonawanda Seneca Nation is asking a New York federal judge to scrap a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service permit allowing a wastewater pipeline to cross a national wildlife refuge in its ancestral territory and block its construction, saying the agency's review was inadequate and construction has already led to damaging drilling fluid spills.

  • November 30, 2023

    US Must Cover Hawaii Fuel Leak Payment, Insurer Says

    A Honolulu-based insurer that paid over half a million dollars to a fast food operator that was forced to temporarily shut down after fuel leaks at a Navy facility contaminated the public water supply told a Hawaii federal court that the U.S. is on the hook for those costs.

  • November 29, 2023

    Watchdog Says DLA Fairly Rejected Berets Over Visible Seams

    The U.S. Defense Logistics Agency fairly booted an apparel company from the competition for a $13.3 million military berets contract, after the company designed a beret with an unacceptable outside seam, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said.

  • November 29, 2023

    Blue Cross Still Stalling On Claims Data, Tribe Says

    A Native American tribe said Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan still has not handed over a set of claims data related to tribal members' care despite six orders from a Michigan federal court and attorney fee sanctions against the insurer, as it made its second bid for a default win in the case.

  • November 29, 2023

    GAO Backs Army Elevator Repair Deal At Ga. Base

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied a protest over a U.S. Army contract for elevator maintenance, saying the Army met its solicitation requirements when it awarded the contract to an allegedly inexperienced company located far from the relevant base.

  • November 29, 2023

    Local Gov't Org Backs Baltimore In Incarceration Pay Fight

    An advocacy organization for local governments backed Baltimore County, Maryland, in its effort to convince the Fourth Circuit to uphold a ruling that people who performed work at a county recycling plant while incarcerated were not considered employees under federal law, telling the court that reversal would ultimately harm incarcerated people.

  • November 29, 2023

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Boeing Jets, Robots, IT Deals

    The federal government advanced a $2.5 billion plan to modernize the Indian Health Service's health records system, purchased $2.3 billion more of refueling tankers from Boeing, and is weighing adding robots to its $132 billion fast-paced construction of new nuclear submarines. Here are Law360's top government contracts for November 2023.

  • November 29, 2023

    Feds Sanction, Seize N. Korea-Linked Crypto Mixer

    Hours after the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced new sanctions Wednesday against Sinbad, a company that anonymizes virtual currency transactions, the site was down, following allegations that it laundered funds for North Korean hackers, drug trafficking and child sex abuse.

  • November 29, 2023

    Tribe Can Join Tulsa Litigation, But Judge Has Questions

    A federal judge is conditionally allowing an Oklahoma tribe to participate in an ongoing dispute between a Choctaw Nation member and the city of Tulsa over the municipality's right to prosecute tribal citizens for violating laws on reservation lands.

  • November 29, 2023

    NASA Center Doesn't Have To Use County Waste Contractor

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has rejected a protest by Waste Management over NASA's Kennedy Space Center declining to contract with the company for waste disposal services, saying a Florida county's exclusive deal with the company didn't extend to the center.

  • November 29, 2023

    Ex-Atty Convicted In Philly School Scheme Disbarred In NJ

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has signed off Tuesday on the disbarment of a lawyer who was convicted in a Philadelphia public school embezzlement scheme involving the son of former Pennsylvania U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah.

  • November 28, 2023

    Power Cos. Urge Claims Court To Revisit Offset Decision

    Two power companies have asked the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to reconsider its ruling in two consolidated cases over the government's failure to dispose of spent nuclear fuel, saying the decision wrongly counted revenue from ratepayers as additional company profits.

  • November 28, 2023

    2nd Circ. Revives Timed-Out Siemens False Claims Act Suit

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday revived a whistleblower's years-old lawsuit against Siemens that alleged the manufacturing company had provided false certifications to the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, finding that a lower court improperly tossed the suit for procedural reasons surrounding service of his complaint.

  • November 28, 2023

    Defense Contractor's Fraud Frees DLA Of Repayment Duty

    The U.S. Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals freed the military from covering potentially hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of costs incurred by a food supplier that pled guilty to overcharging the military on a defense contract.

  • November 28, 2023

    Feds Underpaid $281M In Support Costs, Ariz. Tribe Says

    The Gila River Indian Community claims the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Indian Health Service shortchanged it millions of dollars in funding for carrying out health care programs, and caused it more than a quarter-billion dollars in damages over four years.

  • November 28, 2023

    Recovery Firm's Ukraine Contract Beef Too Old, 1st Circ. Says

    The First Circuit has refused to revive an international asset recovery firm's long-standing dispute with the Ukrainian government over alleged unpaid work the firm did to uncover assets stolen by a former prime minister, saying most of the claims had expired.

  • November 28, 2023

    Public Housing Tenant Sues NC Town Over Mold Infestation

    A single mom of four is suing a small town in eastern North Carolina and a property management company on behalf of a proposed class of public housing residents who claim their apartments were overtaken by mold.

  • November 28, 2023

    Panel Sends Case Involving 'Ancient' Doctrine To La. Justices

    Louisiana's high court is the right venue to consider whether a unique, deeply rooted state legal doctrine lets a Chesapeake Energy unit take post-production costs off the top of revenues owed to owners of state-mandated oil and gas pools, according to a divided Fifth Circuit opinion.

  • November 28, 2023

    Law Firm Leaders Cautiously Optimistic Heading Into 2024

    Major U.S. law firms are steadfast in their commitment to the pursuit of further growth despite ongoing economic uncertainty. Here’s what the leaders of four Leaderboard firms have to say about how the legal industry is preparing for next year.

  • November 28, 2023

    The 2023 Law360 Pulse Leaderboard

    Check out the Law360 Pulse Leaderboard to see which first-in-class firms made the list this year.

  • November 27, 2023

    US, UK Unveil Global Agreement For Securing AI Systems

    Cybersecurity officials in the U.S. and U.K. on Monday rolled out first-of-their-kind guidelines, backed by more than a dozen other countries, that are intended to help ensure developers of artificial intelligence systems are building and deploying secure products. 

  • November 27, 2023

    Feds Accountable For BIA Officials' Actions, 9th Circ. Hears

    Two Native American advocacy groups are urging a Ninth Circuit panel to overturn a Montana district court's ruling that the federal government isn't responsible for the actions of its Bureau of Indian Affairs officers, saying the prospect that the case is not suitable for torts litigation undermines the safety of Native American women.

  • November 27, 2023

    State Dept. Urged To Improve Embassy Power Plant Planning

    A U.S. Department of State watchdog has called on the agency to improve planning, contracting and oversight processes for its power plant projects amid ongoing performance issues with an $118 million project at the U.S. Embassy in Iraq.

  • November 27, 2023

    Amicus Groups Tell High Court To End Chevron Deference

    Six groups, including the Ohio Chamber of Commerce and several former state supreme court judges, filed friend-of-the-court briefs on Monday urging the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a decades-old legal doctrine stating that courts must defer to federal agencies' interpretation of ambiguous laws.

  • November 27, 2023

    Insurer Seeks $17.4M For Failed La. Dredging Projects

    An insurer urged a Louisiana federal court Monday to award it over $17 million in damages following several dredging contractors' alleged abandonment of multiple public utility projects, arguing that the contractors failed to pay it back for bonds it issued under a 2014 indemnity agreement.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • AI Use May Trigger False Claims Act's Public Disclosure Bar

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    The likely use of publicly available artificial intelligence tools to detect government fraud by combing through large data sets will raise complex questions about a False Claims Act provision that prohibits the filing of claims based on previously disclosed information, say Nick Peterson and Spencer Brooks at Wiley Rein.

  • Biden Climate Push Expands With Contractor GHG Focus

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    President Joe Biden's recent announcement that federal agencies will consider contractors' greenhouse gas emissions when making procurement decisions demonstrates his administration's continued interest in using government contracting as a vehicle for reducing climate-related impacts — a theme first established in the early months of his term, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Unpacking GAO's FY 2023 Bid Protest Report

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    The U.S. Government Accountability Office's recent bid protest report reflects an increase in sustained protests, illustrating that disappointed offerors may see little reason to refrain from seeking corrective action — but there is more to the story, say Aron Beezley and Patrick Quigley at Bradley Arant.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • A Closer Look At Proposed HHS Research Misconduct Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' proposed updates to its policies on research misconduct codify many well-known best practices, but also contain some potential surprises for the research community and counsel, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Suspension And Debarment: FY 2023 By The Numbers

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    A comparative analysis of System for Award Management data, culminating with fiscal year 2023, reveals a year-over-year drop in annual suspension and debarment numbers so significant as to leave the government contracting community trying to figure out what is happening, says David Robbins at Jenner & Block.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Contracts Disputes Recap: Expect Strict Application Of Rules

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    Zachary Jacobson and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine four recent cases highlighting the importance, for both contractors and government agencies, of strict compliance with the Contract Disputes Act’s jurisdictional requirements and with the Federal Acquisition Regulation's remedy-granting clauses.

  • Unpacking The FAR Council's Cybersecurity Rules Proposal

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    New reporting and information sharing requirements in the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed cybersecurity regulations would create new False Claims Act enforceability risks, and could be a focus for the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Cyber Fraud Initiative, say Townsend Bourne and Lillia Damalouji at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

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