Georgia

  • April 23, 2024

    New Ga. Law Restricts Social Media Use For Youth Under 16

    A bill signed into law Tuesday by Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp imposes new restrictions on minors' internet usage, including requiring social media companies to verify that users are 16 or older unless they receive approval from an individual's parents to use the service.

  • April 23, 2024

    Biz Ownership Law Constitutional, Lawmakers Tell 11th Circ.

    The Corporate Transparency Act is a garden-variety exercise of Congress' powers to address threats to national security, foreign affairs, commerce and tax collection, five Democratic lawmakers told the Eleventh Circuit, disputing a ruling that the law is unconstitutional.

  • April 23, 2024

    Insurer Wants Out Of Skate Rink Rape Suit Coverage

    A Selective Insurance Group affiliate on Monday asked a Georgia federal court to find it has no duty to defend an Atlanta-area skate rink where an employee allegedly kidnapped and raped an unaccompanied child in the aftermath of a shooting last year.

  • April 23, 2024

    Ga. Bar Race Bias Suit Should Stay Dead, 11th Circ. Told

    The State Bar of Georgia told the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday that a federal court was right to wash its hands of a racial bias suit filed by an attorney against the bar last year, because the Peach State's high court is the only court with jurisdiction over attorney discipline issues.

  • April 23, 2024

    Bike Parts Co. Investor Wants Scott + Scott For Class Counsel

    An investor suing a Georgia bicycle parts maker has asked a federal district court to appoint Scott + Scott Attorneys At Law LLP and the Schall Law Firm lead counsel in litigation alleging the company hid from shareholders slumping sales and demand.

  • April 23, 2024

    Lin Wood Seeks Defamation Suit Pause Amid Insurance Spat

    Counsel for disbarred attorney Lin Wood has asked a Georgia federal judge to halt a defamation suit brought by Wood's former colleagues while a spat over his legal insurance plays out in the Georgia court system.

  • April 22, 2024

    Feds Botched Building Contract Prices, Watchdog Reports

    Federal building overseers in the Southeast U.S. used distorted pricing for medium-term construction contracts that produced significantly inflated and unreasonably low-cost estimates, according to a government watchdog.

  • April 22, 2024

    New Atlanta-Area City Beats Constitutional Challenge

    A Georgia state court judge Friday tossed a lawsuit challenging the legitimacy of a newly incorporated city in suburban Atlanta, ruling that a provision of the cityhood referendum allowing it to create a special tax district wasn't a violation of the state constitution.

  • April 22, 2024

    Congress Can Enact Corp. Transparency, Orgs Tell 11th Circ.

    Congress is empowered to require American companies to report their beneficial owners to the federal government because there is ample evidence they've previously been used to fund hostile foreign actors, evade sanctions and traffic drugs, two think tanks told the Eleventh Circuit in an amici brief.

  • April 22, 2024

    Opioid Marketer Completes $1.5M Damages Settlement With Del.

    Delaware's chancellor signed off Monday on a $1.5 million payment to the state by a company that helped Purdue Pharmaceuticals market its opioid products, the latest step in a $358 million, 50-state damages settlement reached with Publicis Health LLC.

  • April 22, 2024

    GM, Others Sued For Sharing Driver Data With Insurers

    Two New Jersey drivers say they saw increases in their insurance premiums after General Motors and its OnStar unit allegedly used apps installed in their vehicles to illegally share driver data with consumer reporting agencies and insurance carriers without their consent.

  • April 22, 2024

    As DA Aims High, Trump Defense Gets 'Down And Dirty'

    Donald Trump lifted the curtain Monday on his strategy to win over jurors in his New York criminal hush-money trial, as a lawyer for the former president hammered the state's "liar" star witness and rejected the prosecution's quixotic framing of the case, experts observed.

  • April 22, 2024

    Cos. Want Ga. Firm Punished For 'Impossible' COVID-19 Suit

    A Georgia law firm should face sanctions for pursuing claims that several ship operators infected a longshoreman with COVID-19 since those claims were "factually impossible" and their sanctions motion was filed on time, the companies told a Georgia federal court.

  • April 22, 2024

    Ga. Pesticide Maker Denies DOL Whistleblower Charges

    A Georgia pesticide maker has denied all wrongdoing after being hit with a U.S. Department of Labor complaint earlier this year that accused the company of firing a whistleblower who complained about her exposure to dangerous chemical fumes.

  • April 22, 2024

    Trump Led Plot To Undermine 2016 Election, NY Jury Told

    A prosecutor told a Manhattan jury on Monday that Donald Trump was the head of a conspiracy to undermine the integrity of the 2016 election through hush-money payments, kicking off the first criminal trial of a former president.

  • April 22, 2024

    Coverage Recap: Day 1 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments to adult film actress Stormy Daniels ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a full recap from day one.

  • April 19, 2024

    Trump On Verge Of Legal History As Full NY Jury Picked

    Jury selection wrapped up Friday in the hush money trial of Donald Trump, setting the stage for opening statements to begin on Monday after a New York appeals court denied a last-ditch bid by the former president to delay the unprecedented case.

  • April 19, 2024

    Ga. Judges Find No 'Magic Wand' For Voting Rights Suits

    In a series of recent trials challenging Georgia’s election laws, federal judges have shown a reluctance to dictate sweeping changes to state voting protocols, preferring to tinker around the edges while leaving broad policymaking up to legislative officials.

  • April 19, 2024

    AI Health Data Co. Faces Investor Suit Over Accounting Issues

    Atlanta-based health data platform company Sharecare and two of its executives face accusations that they failed to disclose certain accounting issues to investors, leading to stock price declines when the issues became public, according to a shareholder suit filed Friday in California federal court.

  • April 19, 2024

    Fla. Can't Wage Real Estate War On Foreigners, 11th Circ. Told

    A group of Chinese citizens and a brokerage firm urged the Eleventh Circuit on Friday to block Florida from enforcing a law prohibiting certain foreign nationals from owning land while they challenge the statute's constitutionality, saying it's discriminatory and preempted by federal authority.

  • April 19, 2024

    Atty Says False Testimony Justifies Chrisleys' Acquittal

    Attorneys for Todd and Julie Chrisley of the reality television show "Chrisley Knows Best," who are in prison after being convicted on federal charges of bank fraud and tax evasion, urged the Eleventh Circuit to undo their convictions on Friday, arguing prosecutors knowingly presented false, prejudicial testimony at trial.

  • April 19, 2024

    Trump's Trial Is Unprecedented. Attys On Juries? Not So Much

    With two BigLaw attorneys tapped for the jury box in Donald Trump's first-in-history criminal case, Law360 spoke to trial vets who said their own experience in this tables-turned situation shows lawyers can make for highly engaged jurors under the right circumstances.

  • April 19, 2024

    Feds Want Prison For Ga. Chiropractor In NBA Health Fraud

    Federal prosecutors have asked a New York federal judge to impose a 10- to 16-month prison sentence for a chiropractor who admitted to conspiring with former Celtics forward Glen "Big Baby" Davis to commit healthcare and wire fraud by submitting fake invoices to the NBA health plan.

  • April 18, 2024

    State Sen. Tells Ga. Judge It's 'Fact' He Was 2020 Elector

    Georgia state Sen. Shawn Still, who was indicted alongside former President Donald Trump and over a dozen others last August, urged the judge overseeing the state's election interference case to accept as fact that he was an "elected and qualified" Republican presidential elector from Georgia during the 2020 presidential election.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ga.'s Absentee Rules Trample Political Speech, Court Told

    At the close of a trial challenging provisions of Georgia's controversial 2021 election reform law, counsel for a pair of voter engagement groups told a federal judge Thursday the state's increased restrictions on absentee ballot mailers are counterproductive efforts that continue to infringe upon the First Amendment.

Expert Analysis

  • Parsing FTC's Intercontinental-Black Knight Merger Challenge

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent Article III case challenging a merger between Intercontinental Exchange and Black Knight suggests the agency is using a structuralist approach to evaluate the merger's potential anti-competitive harm, says David Evans at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Opinion

    Harsh 11th Circ. Rebuke Should Inspire Changes At CFPB

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent Consumer Financial Protection Bureau v. Brown decision, which found the CFPB's conduct had been egregious in a debt collection enforcement action, should encourage some reflection at the bureau regarding its level of attention to the reasonable due process concerns of regulated institutions, says Eric Mogilnicki at Covington.

  • Keep Up With Telemarketing Compliance: State Law Roundup

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    As more states enact mini-Telephone Consumer Protection Acts to seemingly fill the "autodialer" void left by the U.S. Supreme Court's Facebook v. Duguid ruling, compliance will become a difficult game of whack-a-mole — some of the laws regulate equipment, while others restrict to whom calls can be made, and more, say attorneys at Blank Rome.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • Series

    Ga. Banking Brief: All The Notable Compliance Updates In Q2

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    Legislation signed into law in the second quarter of the year in Georgia tackled a broad range of issues that will affect financial institutions, from money laundering and consumer protection to commercial financing disclosures and a lengthy cleanup of the banking and finance code, says Elizabeth Garner at Parker Hudson.

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Tide May Be Turning On Texas Two-Step Bankruptcy Strategy

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    Recent developments in several high-profile bankruptcy cases suggest that the use of the Texas Two-Step to shield solvent companies from tort claims may be falling out of favor, but until the U.S. Supreme Court hears one of these cases the strategy will remain divisive and the subject of increased scrutiny, say attorneys at Rivkin Radler.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • What The ESG Divide Means For Insurers And Beyond

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    The debate around ESG is becoming increasingly polarized, with some states passing legislation that prohibits the use of ESG factors and others advancing affirmative legislation, highlighting the importance for insurers and other companies to understand this complex legal landscape, say Scott Seaman and Bessie Daschbach at Hinshaw.

  • 4 Legal Issues Grant-Funded Broadband Projects May Face

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    The Biden administration's recently announced funding allocations represent the largest ever government investment in broadband internet infrastructure, but these new development opportunities will require navigation of complicated and sometimes arcane legal environments, says Casey Lide at Keller & Heckman.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

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