Georgia

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices To Scrutinize Revoked Visa Petition

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to examine an Eleventh Circuit decision that federal courts lack authority to review the revocation of a previously approved visa petition for a Palestinian man whose marriage was found to fraudulently skirt immigration laws.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices Skip Atty's Race Bias Suit Over Paid Suspension

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to wade into a former congressman's case alleging a nonprofit legal aid firm violated Title VII's ban on race discrimination when it suspended him with pay, passing on the chance to apply a newly crafted high court standard addressing what kinds of workplace actions can sustain a bias lawsuit. 

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ga. Judge Calls Off Hail Mary To Block Arena Football Game

    Attorneys for an arena football league missed their shot Friday evening at blocking one of its former teams from playing in a rival league's opening weekend, after a series of housekeeping oversights ended with a Georgia federal judge denying their bid for a preliminary injunction.

  • April 26, 2024

    DQ Upheld For Challenger To Ga. Election Case Judge

    A Georgia state court judge on has upheld the disqualification of a judicial candidate who had planned to run against the judge overseeing former President Donald Trump's Georgia election interference case.

  • April 26, 2024

    Thomas' Long Quest To Undo A 'Grave Constitutional Error'

    A quarter-century after Justice Clarence Thomas cast a pivotal vote against jury trial rights and rapidly regretted it, his relentless campaign to undo the controversial precedent is suddenly center stage with a serious shot at succeeding, as judges and lawyers increasingly deem the decision dubious and the U.S. Supreme Court chips away at its edges.

  • April 26, 2024

    Cox Says Insurers Must Pay For Settled DMCA Suit

    Cox Enterprises Inc. sued two of its insurers this week over allegations they failed to cover the company's more than $15 million in expenses in defending, and ultimately settling, a novel lawsuit that aimed to hold the internet service provider liable for users' illegal downloads.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ga. Residents Want In On $300M Monkey Farm Fight

    Four Georgia residents have asked a federal judge to let them intervene in a dispute over the construction of a sprawling primate-rearing farm in Bainbridge, alleging the local development authority that approved a $300 million bond deal for the project is colluding with the farm's backers to advance the project.

  • April 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Finds No Anti-Black Juror Bias In Murder Trial

    The Eleventh Circuit has denied a new trial to a Mexican man arguing prosecutors used all but one of their peremptory strikes to exclude potential jurors who were Black or Hispanic at the trial in Georgia where he was sentenced to life in prison for murdering a whistleblower connected to his work.

  • April 26, 2024

    The Week In Trump: Tabloid Testimony, High Court Drama

    Donald Trump and his attorneys have been fighting high-stakes legal battles on several fronts as they grappled with a criminal hush money trial in Manhattan, argued at the U.S. Supreme Court for presidential immunity and tried to quash criminal election interference-related charges in Georgia.

  • April 25, 2024

    Microsoft, Nintendo And Others Sued Over Addictive Games

    A gamer sued Microsoft Corp., Nintendo of America Inc., Rockstar Games Inc. and other video game developers Wednesday in Georgia federal court over allegations that they are intentionally getting users addicted to boost profits, saying he's suffering from depression and anxiety because of his addiction.

  • April 25, 2024

    Morehouse Med Fired Staffer Who Exposed Affair, Suit Says

    A former diversity staffer at Atlanta's Morehouse School of Medicine alleged an array of workplace violations in a new lawsuit, claiming he was denied overtime pay for after-hours work and fired when he complained about harassment stemming from sexual entanglement among the school's executives.

  • April 25, 2024

    Trump Legal Fees Paid Via Illegal Scheme, Watchdog Org Says

    Donald Trump's 2024 presidential campaign and related political committees have masked payments for millions of dollars in legal work done for the former president in a possible violation of federal law, an election watchdog claims in a complaint filed Wednesday with the Federal Election Commission.

  • April 25, 2024

    Wellstar Sent Meta Patient Data Without Consent, Suit Alleges

    Wellstar Health System Inc. was hit with a proposed class action in Georgia federal court, with a patient alleging the confidential health information of "millions" was shared with Meta Platform Inc. without consent after Wellstar installed the company's tracking and collection tools on its website and patient portal.

  • April 25, 2024

    EEOC Pregnant Worker Rule Draws Suit From Red State AGs

    A group of 17 Republican state attorneys general hit the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission with a lawsuit Thursday over the agency's recently finalized Pregnant Workers Fairness Act regulations, saying the EEOC's stance that the PWFA encompasses abortion-related workplace accommodations is unconstitutional. 

  • April 25, 2024

    Justices Skeptical Of Trump's Absolute Immunity Bid

    A majority of the U.S. Supreme Court appeared open Thursday to the idea of limited immunity for former presidents related to the office's core constitutional powers, but divisions emerged among the justices over how to determine when acts outside of that narrow category are potentially subject to criminal prosecution.

  • April 25, 2024

    Ga. Fund Manager Stole Millions And Fled Country, SEC Says

    An Atlanta financier was hit with a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission civil suit Wednesday alleging he ripped off investors in his nearly $10 million hedge fund, stealing millions to enrich himself while falsifying records of the fund's purported success.

  • April 25, 2024

    EEOC Says Co. Piled Tasks On Black Worker, Then Fired Him

    A real estate company gave a Black manager more than twice as much work as his white colleague, paid him less and then fired him because he was "lazy," the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said in a suit filed in Georgia federal court.

  • April 24, 2024

    3M And Ga. Utility Say $850M PFAS Cleanup Plan A No-Go

    3M, a Georgia utilities provider and carpet and chemical manufacturers told a Georgia federal judge Wednesday they shouldn't have to face an $850 million remediation plan to clean up alleged waterway contamination from forever chemicals.

  • April 24, 2024

    3 Takeaways On How AI Is Forcing Publicity Rights To Evolve

    As digital replicas of someone's voice, image or likeness become easier to create with the help of artificial intelligence, this new era of deepfakes is shining a spotlight on the nation's patchwork of right-of-publicity laws and raising questions over when Congress may act to pass a national framework.  

  • April 24, 2024

    Feds File Conspiracy Charges In $1M La. 'Romance' Fraud

    U.S. prosecutors in Louisiana have charged three Atlanta-area individuals of running "romance scams" to defraud victims of more than $1 million, according to a recently unsealed indictment in Pelican State federal court.

  • April 24, 2024

    Broken Promises Land Ga. Prison Officials In Contempt

    A Georgia federal judge has slapped the state's prison officials with a contempt ruling imposing fines and appointing an independent monitor after finding the state Department of Corrections has for years flouted the terms of a settlement over its treatment of prisoners in its most punitive unit.

  • April 24, 2024

    Seyfarth Picks Up BCLP Corporate Finance Pro In Atlanta

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP is expanding its corporate team with a Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP finance specialist as a partner in its Atlanta office, the firm said Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    11th Circ. Probes High Court Rulings' Effect On DeSantis Case

    The Eleventh Circuit wants Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and the state attorney he suspended to explain how two seemingly conflicting U.S. Supreme Court decisions could influence the appellate court's ability to hear that attorney's challenge to his removal.

  • April 24, 2024

    Trump Says 1890s Ruling Nixes Ga. False Filing Charges

    Former President Donald Trump on Wednesday told a Georgia court a 134-year-old U.S. Supreme Court case requires the court to dismiss state charges that he made false filings in federal court in an alleged attempt to overturn the results of the last presidential election.

Expert Analysis

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Trump's 'I Thought I Won' Jan. 6 Defense Is Unlikely To Prevail

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    Since being indicted for his alleged attempts to overthrow the 2020 presidential election, former President Donald Trump’s legal team has argued that because he genuinely believed he won, his actions were not fraudulent — but this so-called mistake of fact defense will face a steep uphill battle for several key reasons, says Elizabeth Roper at Baker McKenzie.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • Lenders Must Look To The Law As Fla. Joins Disclosure Trend

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    Given the varying range in scope of state commercial financing disclosure laws — including the one recently enacted in Florida — and the penalties for noncompliance, providers of commercial credit should carefully consider whether such laws apply to their commercial lending business, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • OECD Treatment Of Purchased Ga. Film Credits Isn't Peachy

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    Producers considering Georgia as a prospective location for filming may already be concerned that the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's July decision will hamper the eventual 2026 or later sale of their Georgia film tax credits, says Alan Lederman at Gunster.

  • Ga. Mirror-Image Rule Makes Settlements Fraught For Insurers

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    The Georgia Court of Appeals' recent decision in Pierce v. Banks shows how strictly Georgia courts will enforce the rule that an insurer's response to a settlement demand must be a mirror image of the demand — and is a reminder that parties must exercise caution when accepting such a demand, says Seth Friedman at Lewis Brisbois.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Data Breach Rulings Stress Duty For Protecting Worker Data

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    Two recent rulings from the Eleventh Circuit have restricted employers' ability to defend class action claims stemming from data breaches that target employees' personal information, highlighting the importance of cybersecurity measures that acknowledge a heightened obligation to protect workers’ data, say attorneys at Polsinelli.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Opinion

    Justices' Job Transfer Review Should Hold To Title VII Text

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming decision in Muldrow v. City of St. Louis should hold that a job transfer can be an adverse employment action, and the analysis should be based on the straightforward language of Title VII rather than judicial activism, say Lynne Bernabei and Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • 11th Circ. Ruling May Impede Insurers' Defense Cost Recoup

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent Continental Casualty v. Winder Laboratories ruling that insurers cannot obtain reimbursement of defense costs from their insureds where the policy itself does not require such reimbursement is likely to be cited as persuasive authority in Georgia and other states without clear precedent on the issue, say Christy Maple and Robert Whitney at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

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