Georgia

  • April 05, 2024

    Alabama Station Wins Carriage Fight With Dish At FCC

    An Alabama TV station won a Federal Communications Commission ruling against Dish Network, forcing Dish to carry the station throughout the Columbus, Georgia, and Opelika, Alabama, markets after the satellite provider initially refused.

  • April 05, 2024

    Chrisley Must Pay $755K For Slandering Ga. Tax Worker

    Former reality star and convicted fraudster Michael "Todd" Chrisley must pay $755,000 in damages after a federal jury found this week that he slandered a Georgia Department of Revenue employee who played a bit role in his criminal investigation.

  • April 05, 2024

    Home Depot Accused Of Using Fake Discounts Online

    Home Depot has been hit with a class action in Georgia federal court, alleging it tricks buyers into purchasing items online by advertising false original prices and corresponding discounts that create the "illusion of short-lived bargains."

  • April 05, 2024

    Publix Wants Ga. High Court Input On Opioid Public Nuisance

    Grocery chain Publix has asked the Ohio federal court overseeing the opioid multidistrict litigation to send questions to Georgia's high court about whether that state's law allows public nuisance claims over a healthcare provider's dispensing of prescription narcotics.

  • April 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds College's Win In Student's Disability Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday upheld Morehouse School of Medicine's win in a former student's suit claiming it failed to accommodate his disability by providing inadequate note-taking services, ruling that the Georgia federal court made no error in finding that the school had provided adequate accommodations.

  • April 05, 2024

    Insurer, Construction Co. Agree To End $10M Ceiling Fall Suit

    Grange Insurance Co. and a Georgia construction company it sued to avoid paying a $10 million judgment in an underlying injury case over a worker's fall through a ceiling came together with that late worker's wife and agreed to dismiss their indemnity dispute following a settlement.

  • April 05, 2024

    Sprint's $4.5M Nextel Trademark Win Upheld At 11th Circ.

    Sprint Communications Inc. maintained a trademark on its line of walkie-talkie devices and deserved a $4.5 million jury award against an imitator for its unlawful use of the device name and distinctive "chirp" noise, according to an Eleventh Circuit panel ruling.

  • April 05, 2024

    IP Firm Sues Florida Attorney For Using Soundalike Name

    Georgia-based intellectual property firm Bekiares Eliezer LLP has sued an attorney in Florida federal court, alleging he marketed his services with a name similar to its "Founders Legal" brand.

  • April 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Auto Co.'s Win In Disability Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit has refused to reinstate a worker's suit accusing an auto parts manufacturer of firing him because of his gastrointestinal issues, saying he couldn't rebut the company's argument that he was fired for falling asleep at work.

  • April 05, 2024

    Atlanta Braves Accused Of Denying Hire Over Deafness

    The Atlanta Braves were hit with an Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuit Thursday alleging the team turned down an IT director candidate because it was reluctant to accommodate his deafness.

  • April 04, 2024

    Young Thug Can't DQ Prosecutor Over Questions To Witness

    An Atlanta judge on Thursday denied a motion to disqualify the lead prosecutor in the racketeering trial against rapper Young Thug and five others after weighing claims that she had made herself a witness, according to defense counsel.

  • April 04, 2024

    John Eastman Says Inactive Status Hampers Livelihood

    Former Donald Trump attorney John Eastman asked the State Bar Court of California on Wednesday to delay placing him on inactive enrollment while he appeals the recommendation for his disbarment, saying he can't sustain the loss of his livelihood representing clients like Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene.

  • April 04, 2024

    Ga. OB-GYN Office Hit With Data Breach Class Action

    An Atlanta OB-GYN practice has been hit with a class action in Georgia federal court over a January data breach that allegedly impacted the personal and protected health information of tens of thousands of patients.

  • April 04, 2024

    Golf Course Owner Accused Of $4M Lending Fraud Scheme

    A company that loaned more than $4 million to the owner of an Atlanta-area golf course claims he used the money to prop up other businesses, make fraudulent payments and buy exotic cars, according to a lawsuit filed in Georgia federal court.

  • April 04, 2024

    GAO Says Navy Awardee Ineligible Due To Registration Lapse

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has backed a protest over a nearly $5 million Navy custodial services contract, saying the awardee's attempt to re-register in a federal contractor database ahead of expiry didn't excuse a breach of a continuous registration requirement.

  • April 04, 2024

    Higher Ed Groups Warn Of 'Radical Shift' In Suicide Liability

    Four colleges and a slew of higher education advocacy groups have urged the Eleventh Circuit to reject an argument that Atlanta's Emory University should be liable for the suicide of a student, warning that a ruling against the school could bring about a "radical shift" in the university-student relationship.

  • April 04, 2024

    Feds Seek 63-Month Term For $8.6M Embezzlement Scheme

    Federal prosecutors asked a Georgia judge Thursday to hand down a 63-month prison term for a woman who was caught stealing more than $8.6 million from her employer, a scheme the government called "one of the most egregious employer embezzlement cases in recent memory."

  • April 04, 2024

    Ga. Says Listening to Atty-Client Calls Not Unconstitutional

    The state of Georgia has told the state's Supreme Court that prosecutors didn't trample on the Sixth Amendment rights of a man convicted of assault, because they didn't intentionally seek to listen to privileged phone calls between the man and his lawyer and because the phone calls weren't evidence at trial.

  • April 04, 2024

    Trump Can't Duck Secret Doc Charges On Immunity Grounds

    The Florida federal judge overseeing the classified documents case against Donald Trump rejected his bid Thursday to dismiss the criminal indictment against him, saying the charges don't make any reference to the Presidential Records Act that the former president said grants him immunity.

  • April 04, 2024

    Jeffrey Clark Violated Ethics Rules, Panel Says

    Former U.S. Department of Justice Attorney Jeffrey Clark violated professional conduct rules, a D.C. attorney ethics panel preliminarily found Thursday following a disciplinary hearing centered on Clark's alleged efforts to throw the Justice Department behind former President Donald Trump's election fraud narrative.

  • April 04, 2024

    Trump's Free Speech Challenge Rejected In Ga. Election Case

    A state court judge on Thursday refused to dismiss the indictment charging former President Donald Trump and his co-defendants in the Georgia election interference case on First Amendment grounds, saying the charges did not violate their constitutional right to free speech.

  • April 03, 2024

    Ga. Man Gets 3 Years In Prison For COVID-19 Fraud Scheme

    A metro Atlanta man was sentenced to three years in prison and ordered to pay more than $279,000 in restitution for laundering money procured from fraudulent unemployment claims filed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 03, 2024

    Lucky Bucks Ch. 7 Trustee's Fraud Suit Can Continue In Del.

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Wednesday allowed an adversary suit brought by the Chapter 7 trustee for Georgia-based gambling machine company Lucky Bucks Holdings LLC to move forward, saying the court doesn't have enough information about fraud allegations to dismiss the case.

  • April 03, 2024

    Family Drops Suit Against Taser Co. Over Ga. Man's Death

    A family who sued Taser maker Axon Enterprise Inc. and a south Georgia sheriff's office over the 2019 death of a relative at the hands of deputies has dropped its claims against the stun gun manufacturer, a few weeks after it similarly released the sheriff's office from liability.

  • April 03, 2024

    Beloved Georgia Judge Writes His Own Obituary

    Senior U.S. District Judge Hugh Lawson Jr., a revered Georgia jurist known for his humor and lack of pretense, died Friday at 82, leaving behind an obituary in which he described himself as a religious man whose "last conscious thought" would be his wife's name and who considered all his children to be his "favorite."

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How Protected Are AI Product Developers From Liability?

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    ChatGPT is at the center of one of the first notable lawsuits testing the boundaries of defamation protection for artificial intelligence products, and the scarcity of similar litigation underscores how many unanswered questions remain about responsibility for the inaccurate information emerging from AI, says Christopher MacColl at Zuckerman Spaeder.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • What 11th Circ. Revival Of Deaf Employee's Bias Suit Portends

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent Beasley v. O'Reilly Auto Parts decision, which created a circuit split involving the issue of linking accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act to essential job functions, is a curiosity about the court's analysis at least and a potential game changer for employer duties at most, says John Doran at Sherman & Howard.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Trump's 'I Thought I Won' Jan. 6 Defense Is Unlikely To Prevail

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    Since being indicted for his alleged attempts to overthrow the 2020 presidential election, former President Donald Trump’s legal team has argued that because he genuinely believed he won, his actions were not fraudulent — but this so-called mistake of fact defense will face a steep uphill battle for several key reasons, says Elizabeth Roper at Baker McKenzie.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • Lenders Must Look To The Law As Fla. Joins Disclosure Trend

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    Given the varying range in scope of state commercial financing disclosure laws — including the one recently enacted in Florida — and the penalties for noncompliance, providers of commercial credit should carefully consider whether such laws apply to their commercial lending business, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • OECD Treatment Of Purchased Ga. Film Credits Isn't Peachy

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    Producers considering Georgia as a prospective location for filming may already be concerned that the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's July decision will hamper the eventual 2026 or later sale of their Georgia film tax credits, says Alan Lederman at Gunster.

  • Ga. Mirror-Image Rule Makes Settlements Fraught For Insurers

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    The Georgia Court of Appeals' recent decision in Pierce v. Banks shows how strictly Georgia courts will enforce the rule that an insurer's response to a settlement demand must be a mirror image of the demand — and is a reminder that parties must exercise caution when accepting such a demand, says Seth Friedman at Lewis Brisbois.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Data Breach Rulings Stress Duty For Protecting Worker Data

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    Two recent rulings from the Eleventh Circuit have restricted employers' ability to defend class action claims stemming from data breaches that target employees' personal information, highlighting the importance of cybersecurity measures that acknowledge a heightened obligation to protect workers’ data, say attorneys at Polsinelli.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

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