Employment UK

  • April 05, 2024

    Exec Wins £61K After Being Forced To Quit Following Merger

    A bedding company must pay its former managing director £61,000 ($77,000) after it forced him to quit following a merger by backtracking on his benefits under the deal, and blocking him from entering the premises, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 05, 2024

    UK Urges Delay In Claiming Pensions Until Rules Change

    The U.K. tax authority has warned people to delay claiming their pensions until after Saturday, when the lifetime allowance is abolished, while the government clarifies technical changes to the legislation.

  • April 05, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the BBC sued by former Georgian defense minister David Kezerashvili, Russian businessman Ildar Sharipov file a defamation claim against the publisher of the Liverpool Echo newspaper, MEX Group Worldwide sue Barclays and NatWest, and a climbing gear company hit retailer Next with a claim of copyright infringement. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 05, 2024

    7 Spring Law Changes That Employers Need To Know About

    An array of employment laws taking effect in April should prompt businesses to revisit their policies and think about what more they can be doing to comply, lawyers say.

  • April 05, 2024

    Rothesay Sees 'Unprecedented' Pipeline For Pension Deals

    Pension insurer Rothesay Life said Friday it secured £12.7 billion ($16 billion) in new business premiums across a dozen de-risking retirement savings deals in 2023, with the year ahead marked by an "unprecedented pension risk transfer market pipeline."

  • April 05, 2024

    Senior Doctors Accept Pay Offer After A Year Of Strikes

    Senior doctors have voted to accept the government's latest pay offer, ending a year of strikes, the British Medical Association said on Friday.

  • April 05, 2024

    UK Pension Schemes Maintain Near-Record Surpluses

    The aggregate surplus of the U.K.'s defined benefit pension sector remained at near-record levels of around £151 billion ($190.8 billion) in March, a consultancy has said.

  • April 05, 2024

    Academic Can't Sue University Over Anti-Semitism Probe

    A university lecturer lost her bid to sue her employer after it investigated and ultimately cleared her of allegations she had made anti-Semitic comments after a judge found she could not skirt a settlement agreement she had already signed with the institution. 

  • April 04, 2024

    Advocate Hit With 5-Year Ban Over Doctoring Emails In Jersey

    A legal tribunal banned an advocate from practicing in England for five years on Thursday following the ruling of a Jersey court that he had dishonestly doctored emails to hide the fact that he had caused "excessive" delays for a client.

  • April 04, 2024

    Sexually Harassed Class Helper Fired For Lying Wins Payout

    A teaching assistant who lied about having COVID-19 to go on vacation has won a £9,309 ($11,775) payout after a female headmaster sexually harassed him, then sacked him following a flawed investigation into his lies.

  • April 04, 2024

    Law Firm Defeats Adviser's Unfair Redundancy Claim

    A Scottish law firm didn't unfairly cull one of its financial advisers during a redundancy process because bosses scored candidates with a reasonable checklist, an employment tribunal has ruled. 

  • April 04, 2024

    Head Teacher Fired Trade Union Rep Over 'Personal Animosity'

    A primary school's head teacher unfairly dismissed and discriminated against a trade union representative because he didn't like that she was challenging his "dictatorial attitude," an employment tribunal ruled.

  • April 04, 2024

    Insurer Wants Greater Flexibility On State Pension Age

    The U.K. government should explore giving Britons more choice over when they can start claiming their state pension amid concerns over increases to the official retirement age, insurer Aegon said Thursday.

  • April 04, 2024

    Defense Ministry OK To Reject Foreign Nationals For Jobs

    An employment judge has thrown out a discrimination claim against the U.K.'s defense ministry, ruling that U.K. law allows the government body to reject non-British nationals from certain jobs for national security reasons.

  • April 04, 2024

    Gambling Biz Says Rival, Ex-Employees Copied Game Code

    An online gambling company has sued two former members of staff and its rival for allegedly plagiarizing copyrighted source code for its "Slingo" online betting game to produce several competing products.

  • April 04, 2024

    Standard Life Bags Insurer's Pension Plan In £95M Deal

    Standard Life has completed a £95 million ($120 million) buy-in of a pension scheme sponsored by Brit Insurance in a deal guided by Burges Salmon LLP.

  • April 04, 2024

    Money Was Siphoned To Former Exec's Wife, Insurer Says

    A Liechtenstein insurer suing two of its former directors for allegedly funneling millions of pounds to accounts they had ties to has now accused one of the men's wives of also benefiting from unauthorized payments.

  • April 03, 2024

    More Pension Schemes Considering Running On, LCP Says

    An increasing number of pensions schemes are considering running on their retirement savings plans as funding levels continue to strengthen in the U.K., a consultancy has said.

  • April 03, 2024

    Advocate Fights BSB Disciplinary Over Misconduct In Jersey

    An advocate who was found guilty by courts in Jersey of dishonesty and professional misconduct, including doctoring emails to hide that he caused delays for clients, fought disciplinary proceedings brought by the English barristers' regulator on Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    Rugby Concussion Litigation Grows As 60 More Players Sue

    Sixty rugby union players are suing the sport's governing bodies over their failure to prevent concussion-related injuries, seeking to join hundreds of others already arguing that current practices are putting lives at risk.

  • April 03, 2024

    Woman Fired For Morning Sickness Wins £22K Payout

    An employee at a plumbing business in Scotland has won over £22,000 ($27,651) after a tribunal found the company fired her for missing work because of morning sickness.

  • April 03, 2024

    Trainee Manager Axed After Medical Issue Wins Claim

    A management trainee at a housing developer has won his claims for discrimination and unfair dismissal against his employer, as a tribunal found that the company had failed to make reasonable adjustments for his disability and then unfairly fired him for failing to make progress in his job.

  • April 03, 2024

    Single Pensioner Income Inequality Found To Be Widening

    Government data shows income disparity between rich and poor single pensioners is widening in the U.K. due to low earnings growth and rising housing costs, according to research by consultancy Broadstone published Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    Insurer Lands Battery Brand Pension Scheme In £44M Deal

    Insurer Just Group said Wednesday it has completed a £44 million ($55.3 million) buy-in of a pension scheme sponsored by battery and lighting brand Energizer Group Ltd.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Denies He Blew Whistle To Deflect Scandal

    Autonomy's former U.S. chief financial officer denied under cross-examination Tuesday in the California criminal fraud trial of ex-CEO Michael Lynch that he brought whistleblower concerns about alleged accounting irregularities to the software company's Deloitte auditors to "cover" himself after a payroll scandal emerged in his department.

Expert Analysis

  • Emerging Trends From A Busy Climate Litigation Year

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    Although many environmental cases brought in the U.K. were unsuccessful in 2023, they arguably clarified several relevant issues, such as climate rights, director and trustee obligations, and the extent to which claimants can hold the government accountable, illustrating what 2024 may have in store for climate litigation, say Simon Bishop and Patrick Kenny at Hausfeld.

  • 2024 Will Be A Busy Year For Generative AI And IP Issues

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    In light of increased litigation and policy proposals on balancing intellectual property rights and artificial intelligence innovation, 2024 is shaping up to be full of fast-moving developments that will have significant implications for AI tool developers, users of such tools and rights holders, say lawyers at Mishcon de Reya.

  • How Businesses Can Prepare For Cyber Resilience In 2024

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    With cybersecurity breaches one of the biggest threats to U.K. businesses and as legislation tightens, organizations should prioritize their external security measures in 2024 and mitigate risks by being well-informed on internal data protection procedures, says Kevin Modiri at Nelsons.

  • Dyson Decision Highlights Post-Brexit Forum Challenges

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    The High Court's recent decision in Limbu v. Dyson, barring the advancement of group supply chain claims against Dyson subsidiaries in the U.K. and Malaysia, suggests that, following Brexit, claims concerning events abroad may less frequently proceed to trial in England, say lawyers at Debevoise.

  • Best Legal Practices For The Holiday Party Season

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    With the holiday party season in full swing, two recent Solicitors Regulation Authority decisions serve as a useful reminder to both individuals and firms of the potential employment and regulatory consequences when misconduct is alleged to have occurred at a work event, say lawyers at CM Murray.

  • Foreign Assets Ruling Suggests New Tax Avoidance Approach

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    The U.K. Supreme Court's recent ruling in His Majesty's Revenue & Customs v. Fisher, which found that the scope of the transfer of foreign assets is narrow, highlights that the days of rampant tax avoidance have been left behind, and that the need for wide-ranging and uncertain tax legislation is lessening, says James Austen at Collyer Bristow.

  • Key Questions Ahead Of 2024 Right-To-Work Changes

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    In 2024, the U.K. will increase the maximum civil penalty for companies hiring employees who don't have legal permission to work, so employers should work toward minimizing the risk of noncompliance, including by using an identity service provider to carry out digital right-to-work checks, says Gemma Robinson at Foot Anstey.

  • Migration Data Could Mean Big 2024 Changes For Employers

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    In light of the Office for National Statistics' recent revised net migration figures, the government has taken a tough stance on reducing migration, announcing numerous upcoming immigration rules changes that employers need to be aware of, including work sponsorship, say Caroline Bagley, Emma Morgan and Adil Qadus at Shoosmiths.

  • The Top 7 Global ESG Litigation Trends In 2023

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    To date, ESG litigation across the world can largely be divided into seven forms, but these patterns will continue developing, including a rise in cases against private and state actors, a more complex regulatory environment affecting multinational companies, and an increase in nongovernmental organization activity, say Sophie Lamb and Aleksandra Dulska at Latham.

  • Employment Law Changes May Increase Litigation In 2024

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    As we enter 2024, significant employment law updates include changes to holiday pay, gender equality and flexible working, but the sector must deal with the unintended consequences of some of these changes, likely leading to increased litigation in the coming year, says Louise Taft at Jurit.

  • How European Authorities Are Foiling Anti-Competitive Hiring

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    Lawyers at Squire Patton discuss key labor practice antitrust concerns and notable regulation trends in several European countries following recent enforcement actions brought by the European Commission and U.K. Competition and Markets Authority.

  • When Can Bonuses Be Clawed Back?

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    The High Court's recent decision in Steel v. Spencer should remind employees that the contractual conditions surrounding bonuses and the timing of any resignation must be carefully considered, as in certain circumstances, bonuses can and are being successfully clawed back by employers, say Merrill April and Rachael Parker at CM Murray.

  • Trial By AI Could Be Closer Than You Think

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    In a known first for the U.K., a Court of Appeal justice recently admitted to using ChatGPT to write part of a judgment, highlighting how AI could make the legal system more efficient and enable the judicial process to record more accurate and fair decisions, say Charles Kuhn and Neide Lemos at Clyde & Co.

  • Employer Considerations After Visa And Application Fee Hikes

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    The U.K.'s recent visa and application fee increases are having a significant financial impact on businesses, and may heighten the risk of hiring discrimination, so companies should carefully reconsider their budgets accordingly, says Adam Sinfield at Osborne Clarke.

  • Collapse-Risk Buildings Present Liability Challenges

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    Recently, buildings, such as Harrow Crown Court, have been closed due to risk of collapse from use of reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete in their construction, but identifying who will pay for the associated damages may be challenging due to expired limitation periods, say Theresa Mohammed, Jonathan Clarke and Villem Diederichs at Watson Farley.

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