Labor

  • July 05, 2024

    The 3 Biggest Labor Law Decisions Of 2024 So Far

    The first half of 2024 included several significant decisions for labor law, including the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling toughening the standard for evaluating injunctions requested by National Labor Relations Board prosecutors and a Texas federal judge's decision striking down the board's joint employer rule. Here, Law360 examines these cases, as well as some of the other most important decisions from the first six months of the year.

  • July 05, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Weighs Dismissal Of Service Fee Tip Suit

    A New York federal judge on Monday will consider a Long Island restaurant's bid to dismiss a worker's lawsuit claiming the restaurant violated federal and state law by retaining a service charge instead of dividing it among servers as it told customers.

  • July 03, 2024

    SpaceX Can Proceed With 2nd NLRB Constitutional Challenge

    The National Labor Relations Board can't press pause on SpaceX's second fight over the constitutionality of the agency's structure, a Texas federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying the board couldn't demonstrate why the proceeding should be stayed.

  • July 03, 2024

    AFSCME Sues Philadelphia Over Mandatory Return To Office

    American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees affiliates accused the city of Philadelphia of violating labor contracts by not bargaining over the end to remote work, telling a state court that the city's move would impact around 2,900 workers in the bargaining unit.

  • July 03, 2024

    NLRB's First Cemex Order Provides Little Clarity On Rule

    The National Labor Relations Board recently issued its first order requiring an employer to bargain with a union under a relaxed standard for such orders based on violations during representation elections, but attorneys said the decision did not do much to clarify how the new standard will work.

  • July 03, 2024

    Owner Of Defunct Hotel Owes Engineers $400K, Union Says

    The owner of a shuttered New York City hotel is on the hook for more than $400,000 in payments to engineers required under an arbitration award, a hotel workers union argued, telling a federal judge that the owner can't evade the arbitrator's decision.

  • July 03, 2024

    Bronx Defenders Union Braces To Strike In Less Than 3 Weeks

    The Bronx Defenders Union's bargaining committee voted on Tuesday to authorize an unlimited unfair labor practice strike beginning the week of July 22, saying the organization's staff continue to face high attrition, unwieldy caseloads and some of the lowest pay rates of New York City's public defenders.

  • July 03, 2024

    After Chevron Deference: What Lawyers Need To Know

    This term, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron deference, a precedent established 40 years ago that said when judges could defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law in rulemaking. Here, catch up with Law360's coverage of what is likely to happen next.

  • July 02, 2024

    Pact Shouldn't Stop Ky. Public Defenders Row, NLRB GC Says

    A National Labor Relations Board dispute alleging a Kentucky public defender corporation refused to bargain over outsourcing of work with an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers local should go forward, agency prosecutors argued, saying a nonboard settlement between the parties doesn't warrant termination of the proceeding.

  • July 02, 2024

    Gig Drivers' Union Rights Make It To Mass. Ballot

    Massachusetts voters will decide in November whether to give app-based drivers the right to unionize after supporters of a proposed ballot initiative submitted a batch of signatures to the state Tuesday, the Service Employees International Union announced. 

  • July 02, 2024

    Mich. Hospital Mounts NLRB Constitutionality Claims In Court

    A Michigan hospital that withdrew recognition from a union urged a federal judge to dismiss a National Labor Relations Board injunction bid against it, arguing the related agency proceeding is unconstitutional because administrative law judges and the board have protections from presidential removal.

  • July 02, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Broadway Producer's Blacklisting Suit

    The Second Circuit declined Tuesday to undo the tossing of an antitrust lawsuit brought by a Broadway producer who accused a stage workers union of illegally putting him on a "do not work" list, ruling that the union is shielded from liability since it acted in legitimate self-interest.

  • July 02, 2024

    Justices Revive FERC Solar Fight, Citing Chevron Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered the D.C. Circuit to rethink its approval of a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission decision granting market benefits for a small-scale solar energy project in Montana following the justices' blockbuster decision upending judicial deference to regulatory agencies.

  • July 02, 2024

    NLRB Official Nixes IBEW Unit's Bid To Add More Workers

    System administrators can't join a bargaining unit of technicians represented by an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers affiliate at a Florida aerospace facility, a National Labor Relations Board regional director determined, saying there isn't enough evidence that the administrators' role changed significantly.

  • July 01, 2024

    High Court's 1-2 Punch Sets Up Long-Standing Regs For KO

    By ending its term with a stinging combination against federal agencies, the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative bloc left behind a bruised bureaucracy and a regulatory system that's now vulnerable to a barrage of incoming attacks.

  • July 01, 2024

    Advocates Raise Alarms Over Project 2025 Labor Road Map

    Labor advocates are raising concerns over a conservative group's framework for changes in the next Republican administration that calls for the National Labor Relations Board to support the position that political conflicts of interest can support fair representation claims against unions, among other changes to labor law.

  • July 01, 2024

    'Unsecured' Ballot Box Justifies Nixing Vote, Co. Tells DC Circ.

    A building management services company fought the certification of an International Union of Operating Engineers local at the D.C. Circuit on Monday, claiming a National Labor Relations Board agent left the ballot box "unsecured and unattended" during a representation election.

  • July 01, 2024

    ACLU, NLRB Prosecutors Clash Over Outspoken Atty's Firing

    National Labor Relations Board prosecutors and the American Civil Liberties Union filed dueling briefs in a board challenge to an ex-policy attorney's firing, with prosecutors claiming she was fired for speaking out about bad bosses and the group claiming she relentlessly smeared Black supervisors.

  • July 01, 2024

    Amazon Tells NLRB Its Union Banner Ban Should Pass Muster

    The National Labor Relations Board should find that Amazon lawfully barred a pro-union banner in the breakroom at a Staten Island, New York, facility, the e-commerce giant argued, disputing an agency judge's conclusions of federal labor law violations and credibility findings for union salts.

  • July 01, 2024

    DOL's Overtime Rule Survives Texas Marketer's Injunction Bid

    A Texas federal judge refused Monday to grant a marketing company's request to block a U.S. Department of Labor rule that raises the salary thresholds for claiming overtime-exemption under federal law, saying the firm failed to show it will be harmed by the new standards.

  • July 01, 2024

    Starbucks Can't Bar 'Union Strong' On Cup, NLRB Judge Says

    Starbucks violated federal labor law by enforcing a rule that barred workers from putting messages like "union strong" on customers' cups during a "sip-in" action, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, saying the policy could dissuade a reasonable worker from participating in union activities.

  • July 01, 2024

    Supreme Court Widens Window To Challenge Federal Regs

    Legal challenges to federal regulations can be brought outside the normal statute of limitations if someone isn't adversely affected until after the six-year window of time to file suit, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    Texas Justices Back Union Leave Clause's Constitutionality

    A clause in a firefighters union's collective bargaining agreement that permits taking paid leave for negotiations does not violate the Lone Star state's constitution, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday while reversing an award of attorney fees and sanctions against some of the plaintiffs.

Expert Analysis

  • Business Takeaways From Biden's Global Labor Rights Memo

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    President Joe Biden's recent memorandum on protecting worker rights is one of the most expansive statements the administration has made regarding international labor rights policy, and reflects several points of which businesses should take note, including the government’s interest in working with the private sector on these issues and a notable focus on the transition to clean energy, say Tom Plotkin and Pegah Nabili at Covington.

  • How Employers Should Prep For NLRB, OSHA Collaboration

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    The National Labor Relations Board and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s recent announcement of increased interagency cooperation may suggest that each agency will be expanding its scope of inquiry moving forward, and signals that employers need to be prepared for inspections that implicate both OSHA and NLRB issues, say attorneys at Baker Donelson.

  • 3 Evolving Issues Shaping The College Sports Legal Playbook

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    Conference realignment will seem tame compared to the regulatory and policy developments likely to transform college sports in the near future, addressing questions surrounding the employment status of student-athletes, athlete compensation and transgender athletes, say attorneys at O'Melveny.

  • Employer Lessons After 2023's Successful Labor Strikes

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    Following recent historic strikes in the automotive, entertainment and health care industries, employers of all types can learn key insights about how unions may approach negotiations and strikes going forward, and nonunionized workplaces should anticipate a drive for increased union membership, say Lenny Feigel and Mark Neuberger at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • Employers Should Review Training Repayment Tactics

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    State and federal examination of employee training repayment agreements has intensified, and with the potential for this tool to soon be severely limited, employers should review their options, including pivoting to other retention strategies, says Aaron Vance at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Extra NLRB Risks To Consider From Joint Employer Rule Edit

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    The National Labor Relations Board’s return to a broad definition of “joint employer” will expose companies — even those with only theoretical control of their outside consultants, contractors or franchise workers — to increased labor obligations and risks, further escalating their already expanding National Labor Relations Act liabilities, says William Kishman at Squire Patton.

  • AI At Work: Safety And NLRA Best Practices For Employers

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    There are many possible legal ramifications associated with integrating artificial intelligence tools and solutions into workplaces, including unionized workplaces' employer obligations under the National Labor Relations Act, and health and safety issues concerning robots and AI, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How Employers Can Navigate NLRB's Pro-Employee Shift

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent decisions and general counsel memos mark the strong beginning of a trend toward greater pro-employee protections, so employers should proactively engage in risk management by revisiting their handbook policies accordingly, say attorneys at Foley & Lardner.

  • Justices' Coming Fisheries Ruling May Foster NLRA Certainty

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court’s forthcoming decision in the Loper Bright v. Raimondi commercial fisheries' case overrules judicial deference to federal agencies' legal interpretations, it could carry over to the National Labor Relations Board's vacillating interpretations of the National Labor Relations Act, bringing a measure of predictability to the board’s administration of the law, says Corey Franklin at FordHarrison.

  • Aviation Watch: When Are Pilots Too Old To Fly?

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    A recent move by the U.S. House of Representatives to raise the mandatory retirement age for airline pilots from 65 to 67 has reignited a decades-long debate — but this issue is best addressed through collective bargaining between carriers and pilots, rather than through legislation, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • 2 NLRB Rulings On Unilateral Changes Are Bad News For Cos.

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent rulings in Wendt and Tecnocap on unilateral changes to employment terms shift bargaining leverage away from companies, but certain considerations can help employers navigate a contractual hiatus and negotiations for a first union contract, says Henry Morris Jr. at ArentFox Schiff.

  • NY Co-Ops Must Avoid Pitfalls When Navigating Insurance

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    In light of skyrocketing premiums, tricky exclusions and dwindling options, New York cooperative corporations must carefully review potential contractors' insurance policies in order to secure full protection, as even seemingly minor contractor jobs can carry significant risk due to New York labor laws, says Eliot Zuckerman at Smith Gambrell.

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