Commercial Litigation UK

  • November 27, 2023

    Care Group Wants NHS Phone Service To Pay In Death Case

    A private health care provider that settled a £425,000 ($535,800) personal injury claim from a widower whose wife died of coronary artery disease has alleged that managers of an urgent health care phone service negligently failed to recognize the danger in symptoms she reported hours before her death.

  • November 27, 2023

    Test Case Challenges Access To Docs At Unified Patent Court

    Intellectual Property specialist firm Mathys & Squire LLP filed a test case challenging recent European Union Unified Patent Court orders that restricted public access to evidence, following criticisms of the court's approach to open justice.

  • November 27, 2023

    Hospital Fairly Fired Staffer For Refusing To Wear Face Mask

    A hospital staffer sacked for refusing to wear a face covering early in the COVID-19 pandemic has failed to convince the Employment Appeal Tribunal that bosses fired her unfairly based on an unreasonable mask requirement.

  • November 27, 2023

    Homecare Manager Fired In Sham Redundancy Wins Payout

    An employment tribunal has ordered a homecare company to pay £14,153 ($17,841) to a manager who was unfairly fired on the pretext of redundancy, after finding that a new hire took over the axed job shortly after.

  • November 27, 2023

    British Gas Paid Off Engineers To Avoid Talks, Union Claims

    U.K. trade union GMB said Monday that it has begun battling Centrica at an English tribunal after the energy multinational allegedly offered payments to more than 3,000 engineers to avoid collective bargaining during a labor dispute.

  • November 27, 2023

    Support Worker Fired For Warning Of Colleague's 'Partying'

    A family support worker was automatically unfairly dismissed after raising concerns over the alleged party-loving and "chaotic" lifestyle of a male colleague, an employment tribunal has ruled in a split decision.

  • November 27, 2023

    Boxing Referee And Regulator Settle Racist Demotion Claim

    A boxing referee who was demoted for giving a controversial score in a world title fight has settled his race discrimination claim, the regulator for the sport in the U.K. said on Monday.

  • November 27, 2023

    Adviser Says Ex-Firm Wrongly Axed Deal For His Client Base

    A self-employed financial adviser has countersued his former firm alleging that it wrongly ended a contract to acquire his client base, rejecting the firm's bid to recover a £1.28 million ($1.6 million) loan it gave him as part of the deal.

  • November 27, 2023

    MP Says Defamatory Post About 'Corrupt' Councilors Is True

    A senior Conservative member of parliament has hit back at a property developer's libel action, doubling down on allegations that the developer influenced local politicians including his son to secure planning permission. 

  • November 27, 2023

    Acquitted Exec Bids To Keep Name Out Of SFO Bribery DPA

    A former company director who was acquitted of paying bribes for refurbishment contracts told a London court on Monday that his name should be kept out of a £2.5 million ($3.2 million) deferred prosecution agreement between the Serious Fraud Office and two businesses.

  • November 27, 2023

    Laurence Fox Says 'Racist' Libel Row Has Destroyed His Life

    Actor and political activist Laurence Fox testified on Monday that professional work opportunities fell off a cliff after three of his opponents in a High Court libel trial dubbed him a "racist" online.

  • November 27, 2023

    Directors Pushed Shareholders Out Of £58M BWM Engine Deal

    A London appeals court ruled Monday that the directors of a company set up to sell BMW assembly lines to Chinese businesses pushed two key shareholders out of a deal after their relationship broke down.

  • November 27, 2023

    Vallourec Oil Disputes $257M Claim Of Defective Pipe

    Vallourec Oil and Gas France SAS is denying a Ghanaian oil field operator's claim the pipe manufacturer owes $256.8 million in damages caused by leaks, telling a London court that its products did not have manufacturing defects.

  • November 24, 2023

    London Underground Loses Claim Over Back Pain Dismissal

    An employment tribunal has ruled that a train driver with "unbearable" back pain was unfairly dismissed after his bosses at the operator of London Underground failed to run the decision by its top occupational health officer.

  • November 24, 2023

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Glencore face a claim from collapsed hedge fund Eton Park in the wake of its bribery scandal, the ex-CFO of Peppa Pig and Teletubbies toymaker bring data protection proceedings against the employment barrister who represented him at tribunal, and Delta Airlines check in to fresh trademark proceedings against hotel chain Marriott. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • November 24, 2023

    Retailer Hits Back At Visa's 'Absurd' Swipe Fees Claim

    Eyewear manufacturer Luxottica has hit back at Visa's claim that it breached a legal settlement by allowing its subsidiary to sue the card giant, telling a London court that it would be "absurd" if it had agreed to stop all claims brought by companies it purchased in future.

  • November 24, 2023

    Lawyers Bullish On Fixed Legal Costs Following Reforms

    Almost half of lawyers specializing in legal costs have seen turnover rise over the past year and many expect that new opportunities for work will be created under a new regime for fixed recoverable costs, an industry survey revealed on Friday.

  • November 24, 2023

    Atty Struck Off For Duping Investors Owes SRA Extra Costs

    A London court ruled on Friday that the Solicitors Regulation Authority can recover further legal costs from a lawyer struck off for duping potential investors into thinking he was still working for his old firm.

  • November 24, 2023

    Care Worker Fired For Skipping Work, Not Whistleblowing

    A tribunal has tossed a claim by a staff member of a care home that she was sacked for blowing the whistle on an allegedly abusive manager, ruling that her failure to turn up to work was the reason for her dismissal.

  • November 24, 2023

    Vale Denied Chance To Escape BHP's £36B Dam Disaster Case

    Mining giant Vale cannot escape an attempt by BHP to share its £36 billion ($46 billion) potential exposure to damages from the collapse of a Brazilian dam, a London appeals court ruled Friday.

  • November 24, 2023

    Insurance Handler Forced To Quit Over Equal Pay Dispute

    An insurance handler at a brokerage firm deserved the same salary as her male colleague and was constructively dismissed when her bosses refused to level the playing field, a tribunal has ruled.

  • November 24, 2023

    AstraZeneca Denies COVID Vaccine Defective After Clot Claim

    AstraZeneca UK Ltd. has hit back at a claim filed by a software engineer that a "defective" COVID-19 vaccine caused him to develop blood clots, telling a London court that people were generally not entitled to expect that the vaccine would be entirely risk-free.

  • November 23, 2023

    Manager Entitled To Quit After Demotion, Tribunal Rules

    Bosses at a recruitment company constructively dismissed a manager when they trimmed his responsibilities after furloughing him during the COVID-19 pandemic and then refused to upgrade them once life returned to normal, a tribunal has ruled.

  • November 23, 2023

    Telecoms Businessman Loses Libel Claim Against Ex-MP

    A politician won decisively against a telecommunications entrepreneur's libel claim on Thursday after two London appellate judges refused to give the businessman a chance to overturn his loss over allegedly defamatory memos sent to Conservative Party figures and other high-powered individuals.

  • November 23, 2023

    Soccer Club Didn't Break COVID Rules Over Players' Laundry

    A tribunal has ruled that a Premier League soccer team didn't unfairly boot an employee out of the club after he claimed that its request that he unload players' worn kits from the team bus sparked his resignation over COVID-19 fears.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Takeaways For Litigants From Early EU Patent Court Ruling

    Author Photo

    One of the first Unified Patent Court ex parte preliminary injunctions was recently granted in myStromer v. Revolt Zycling, demonstrating the court's ability to decide cases extremely quickly, but parties should be careful in phrasing their motions and sufficiently substantiating them to achieve the desired result, says Antje Brambrink at Finnegan.

  • What To Know About The EU Residency Scheme Changes

    Author Photo

    The U.K. government recently announced extensions to residency status under the EU Settlement Scheme, which is a net positive for U.K.-EU relations and will be welcomed by those affected, including employers concerned about losing employees with expired permission, say Claire Nilson and Abilio Jaribu at Faegre Drinker.

  • High Court Dechert Ruling Offers Litigation Privilege Lessons

    Author Photo

    While the recent High Court ruling in Al Sadeq v. Dechert LLP, which concerned torture conspiracy allegations against the firm, held that litigation privilege can be claimed by a nonparty to proceedings, the exact boundaries of privilege aren't always clear-cut and may necessitate analyzing the underlying principles, says Scott Speirs at Norton Rose.

  • What To Know About AI Fraudsters Before Facing Disputes

    Author Photo

    The potential of artificial intelligence to augment fraudsters' efforts is arguably unprecedented, so lawyers will swiftly need to become familiar with the fundamentals of AI to deal with it in the context of disputes, says Daniel Wyatt and Christopher Whitehouse at RPC.

  • UK Insolvency Reform Review Shows Measures Are Working

    Author Photo

    The U.K. Insolvency Service's recently published review of legislative reforms to the corporate insolvency regime demonstrates that despite being underutilized, the measures have been shown to help viable companies survive, and with the current difficult economic environment, will likely be an important aspect of organizational restructuring going forward, says Kirsten Fulton-Fleming at Taylor Wessing.

  • More UK Collective Actions On The Horizon After Forex Ruling

    Author Photo

    A U.K. appeals court's recent decision in Forex case Evans v. Barclays is likely to significantly widen the scope of opt-out collective proceedings that can be brought, paving the way for more class actions by prospective claimants who have previously been unable to bring individual claims, say Robin Henry and Tamara Davis at Collyer Bristow.

  • How Russia Sanctions May Complicate Contract Obligations

    Author Photo

    Against the backdrop of recent comprehensive sanctions against Russia and Belarus, a review of recent U.K. case law clarifies that certain force majeure clauses likely cover trade sanctions, and that future litigation will further develop the scope of force majeure and frustration in the context of sanctions, says Frances Jenkins at Quillon Law.

  • New Guidance Offers Clarity For Charities On ESG Investing

    Author Photo

    The need for charities to understand investing in line with environmental, social and governance aspirations has never been more pressing, and recently updated U.K. Charity Commission guidance should give trustees confidence to make decisions that are right for their organization, says Robert Nieri at Shoosmiths.

  • Taking Stock Of Company Climate Duties After ClientEarth

    Author Photo

    Despite the High Court's recent dismissal of ClientEarth v. Shell, the case nonetheless has key consequences for companies that are susceptible to being targeted by nonprofit activists as environmental, social and corporate governance lawfare continues, says Dan Harris at Chancery Advisors.

  • Copyright Cheat Sheet: Finding Substantially Similar Songs

    Author Photo

    Using the recent copyright infringement case against Ed Sheeran over his hit song "Thinking Out Loud" as a case study, forensic musicologist Ethan Lustig provides an overview for attorneys of which musical elements do and do not, when altered, create the sense of a new or distinct composition — a determination increasingly sought from experts in court.

  • Lessons On Cricket Patent History And IP Protection At UPC

    Author Photo

    On the heels of the creation of the Unified Patent Court in Europe, Susan Bradley at Marks & Clerk looks at how its development is interwoven with the history of cricket, and why inventors in that field have always taken advantage of the latest developments in intellectual property protection.

  • FCA Case Failures Highlight Value Of Robust Investigation

    Author Photo

    The recent U.K. upper tribunal judgment in Seiler, Whitestone and Raitzin v. The Financial Conduct Authority, criticizing the regulator for accepting a narrative advanced by the firm, makes clear that such admissions must not get in the way of a proper investigation to enable agencies to target the correct individuals, say Tom Bushnell and Olivia Dwan at Hickman & Rose.

  • Reputation Management Lessons From Spacey Case

    Author Photo

    While a U.K. jury recently acquitted actor Kevin Spacey of sexual assault charges, his reputation has been harmed, illustrating the importance for lawyers to balance a client's right to privacy with media engagement throughout the criminal process, says Jessica Welch at Simkins.

  • Factors To Consider In Protecting Software With Trade Secrets

    Author Photo

    With trade secrets protecting subject matter that would not otherwise be eligible for a patent now a mainstay of many multinationals’ intellectual property strategies, software developers have a number of considerations in deciding whether this is a viable alternative to protect their invention, says Dave Clark at Potter Clarkson.

  • What ClientEarth Ruling Means For Shareholder Climate Suits

    Author Photo

    The High Court recently confirmed its earlier decision in ClientEarth v. Shell, illustrating that environmental groups seeking to bring a derivative action against corporate directors' strategic decision making may find it challenging to obtain admissible evidence to establish a prima facie case of a breach, say lawyers at Herbert Smith.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Commercial Litigation UK archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!