Commercial Litigation UK

  • February 20, 2024

    Tesco Branding Does Suggest Price-Matching, Lidl Tells Court

    Counsel for Lidl told an appeals court Tuesday that a London judge was clear in its reasoning why rival supermarket Tesco's club card branding conveyed a "price matching message" to its shoppers in order to benefit from Lidl's reputation for discount prices.

  • February 20, 2024

    Law Firm Says It Can Charge For Work As Estate's Executor

    A solicitor should have been entitled to charge for the work he carried out as the executor of an estate despite the absence of a charging clause in the will, a law firm told an appeals court Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Lundbeck Patent For Alcohol Dependence Treatment Fails

    A European appellate board refused to let Lundbeck patent an alcohol-dependence treatment, ruling that it might have been new, but other scientists would have eventually reached the same conclusion about which patients were most likely to benefit from a drug.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sodexo OK To Sack Prison Officer Over 'Torrent Of Abuse'

    An employment tribunal has ruled that prison management company Sodexo rightly fired a prison officer for gross misconduct after a prisoner accused him of a "torrent of abuse."

  • February 20, 2024

    Banking Oligarch's Wife Loses Russian Sanctions Challenge

    A Ukrainian-Russian tycoon's wife lost a bid on Tuesday to lift sanctions imposed on her after Russia invaded Ukraine, with a London court finding they strike a fair balance between the U.K.'s foreign policy objectives and her individual rights.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fire Brigade Workers Fight To Overturn Pensions Loss

    The firefighters union urged an appeals court on Tuesday to overturn its failed bid to prove that HM Treasury unfairly distributed costs when compensating workers who had received unlawful pensions in the past, arguing that the policy caused sex, age and race discrimination.

  • February 20, 2024

    Straumann Scores Win In Dental Implant Patent Appeal

    A dental implant maker has won its bid to patent an implant with a ceramic surface made of zirconia, after European patent officials found that an amended version was not obvious.

  • February 20, 2024

    Firm Faces Claim From Cleaner Fired For Eating Leftovers

    A cleaner is planning to sue a London law firm and its private cleaning contractor after bosses allegedly fired her for eating a tuna sandwich that lawyers had left behind after a meeting, a trade union has said.

  • February 20, 2024

    Aspiring Judge Loses Race Bias Case Over Failed Application

    An Asian-British solicitor has lost his case accusing a High Court judge of downgrading his application for a judicial post because he wasn't white, with a tribunal concluding that his failure had "nothing whatsoever" to do with his race.

  • February 20, 2024

    Piping Hot Can't Ride TM Wave For Sea-Inspired Products

    An Australian company has failed to register a trademark for "Sea by Piping Hot," after European intellectual property officials ruled that shoppers might think it was a new line of products from U.S. supplement maker Piping Rock.

  • February 20, 2024

    Top 5 Cases To Watch At The Unified Patent Court

    The long-awaited opening of Europe’s Unified Patent Court has brought a period of uncertainty, leaving patent litigators navigating a new frontier for IP disputes and watching closely for the first major decisions set to be handed down in 2024.

  • February 20, 2024

    Insurers Fight To Overturn 'Mixed Injury' Compensation Ruling

    Britain's highest court wrestled on Tuesday with how motorists bringing so-called mixed injury claims should win compensation from insurers, in landmark test litigation that could affect thousands of other cases.

  • February 20, 2024

    Uni Unfairly Fired Lecturer But Fair Dismissal Was Inevitable

    A tribunal has awarded a senior lecturer one week's salary in damages after ruling that his university unfairly sacked him following a procedural redundancy failure but would have fairly dismissed him a week later.

  • February 20, 2024

    Liquidators, Claiming Fraud, Blast Tycoon's Bid To Keep $1B

    Liquidators of U.K. companies that allege a diamond and jewelry tycoon swindled over $1 billion from banks have denied forming trumped-up fraud accusations to destroy his business, telling a London court the businessman has suffered as a "consequence of his own orchestration."

  • February 20, 2024

    Royal Parks Contractors Appeal For Equal Pay With Staff

    Britain's Royal Parks racially discriminated against its cleaners by approving a contract that paid them less than its employees, a group of workers argued at an appeals court Tuesday in a case that could force employers across the U.K. to revisit similar arrangements.

  • February 20, 2024

    HarperCollins Settles With Maxwell Assistant In Epstein Book

    The lawyer for a former assistant to Ghislaine Maxwell said Tuesday that her client has been "vindicated" after HarperCollins admitted that a book it published wrongly said she led one of Jeffrey Epstein's victims to his bedroom.

  • February 20, 2024

    Soccer Club Unfairly Axed Coach Over N-Word Allegations

    A top-tier English soccer club unfairly sacked a part-time coach after mishandling its investigation into allegations that he said a racist slur to a colleague, a tribunal has ruled.

  • February 19, 2024

    Tesco Says Judge 'Over-Impressed' By Lidl TM Evidence

    Tesco argued in an appeals court Monday that a judge relied too heavily on accounts from consumers to determine whether it had tried to pass off its products as being as good as Lidl's when it adopted fresh branding for its loyalty pricing scheme.

  • February 19, 2024

    Unilever Dissolves P&G's Laundry Powder Patent

    Unilever has convinced a European patent board to scrap Procter & Gamble's protection for technology used to dry out laundry powder, with officials concluding the same process was set out in manufacturing handbooks from decades ago.

  • February 19, 2024

    UK Poised For TM Reforms After Joining Pacific Trade Bloc

    Now that the U.K. has signed up to a trans-Pacific trade bloc worth approximately £12 trillion ($15 trillion), intellectual property professionals are preparing for a handful of changes to trademark and geographical indications likely to be introduced in 2024,

  • February 19, 2024

    Oatly Loses Fight To Block 'Oat My Gosh' Milk TM

    Swedish oat drink company Oatly has lost its fight to nix an "Oat My Gosh" trademark after a European intellectual property authority concluded that consumers were unlikely to confuse the two brands.

  • February 19, 2024

    Barrister Hit With 18-Month Ban For Mishandling Client Funds

    A barrister has been handed an 18-month ban for mishandling a direct access client's money and lying to legal complaints investigators about his ability to repay the funds, a London tribunal said Monday.

  • February 19, 2024

    Sex Offense Suspect Can't Get Evidence From BBC

    An anonymous, internationally known figure under investigation for alleged serious sexual offenses cannot use a witness statement from the BBC to persuade prosecutors not to charge him, a London court ruled on Monday.

  • February 19, 2024

    UK Launches Crackdown On 'Fire And Rehire' Tactics

    Employers could face sanctions for firing staff and rehiring them on worse contracts under new rules that will strictly police the practice, the U.K. government said Monday.

  • February 19, 2024

    Brainlab Patent Appeal Fails For Surgery Planning Image Tool

    Brainlab AG has failed to patent an imaging system for anatomical structures that shows soft and hard tissue, as European patent officials ruled that the device lacked any inventive step.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look At 2023's Landmark Insolvency Developments

    Author Photo

    The insolvency landscape in 2023 witnessed pivotal court decisions that will continue to shape the industry in 2024, with a focus on refining director and administrator duties and obligations, and addressing emerging challenges, says Kerri Wilson at Ontier.

  • Hague Judgments Treaty May Boost UK-EU Cooperation

    Author Photo

    The U.K.'s recent decision to sign the Hague Judgments Convention could help rebuild post-Brexit judicial cooperation with the EU by creating a holistic arrangement on mutual recognition and enforcement of judgments, say Patrick Robinson and Stephen Lacey at Linklaters.

  • 5 Key UK Employment Law Developments From 2023

    Author Photo

    Key employment law issues in 2023 suggest that topics such as trade union recognition for collective bargaining in the gig economy, industrial action and menopause discrimination will be at the top of the agenda for employers and employees in 2024, say Merrill April and Anaya Price at CM Murray.

  • Emerging Trends From A Busy Climate Litigation Year

    Author Photo

    Although many environmental cases brought in the U.K. were unsuccessful in 2023, they arguably clarified several relevant issues, such as climate rights, director and trustee obligations, and the extent to which claimants can hold the government accountable, illustrating what 2024 may have in store for climate litigation, say Simon Bishop and Patrick Kenny at Hausfeld.

  • Key 2024 Arbitration Trends In A Changing World

    Author Photo

    As key sectors such as ESG and the global mining and commodities market will continue to generate more arbitration in 2024, procedural developments in arbitral law will both guide future arbitration proceedings and provide helpful lessons on confidentiality, disclosure and professional duty, say Louise Woods and Elena Guillet at V&E.

  • 2024 Will Be A Busy Year For Generative AI And IP Issues

    Author Photo

    In light of increased litigation and policy proposals on balancing intellectual property rights and artificial intelligence innovation, 2024 is shaping up to be full of fast-moving developments that will have significant implications for AI tool developers, users of such tools and rights holders, say lawyers at Mishcon de Reya.

  • Regulating Digital Platforms: What's Changing In EU And UK

    Author Photo

    Lawyers at Mayer Brown assess the status of recently enacted EU and U.K. antitrust regulation governing gatekeeper platforms, noting that the effects are already being felt, and that companies will need to avoid anti-competitive self-preferencing and ensure a higher degree of interoperability than has been required to date.

  • Dyson Decision Highlights Post-Brexit Forum Challenges

    Author Photo

    The High Court's recent decision in Limbu v. Dyson, barring the advancement of group supply chain claims against Dyson subsidiaries in the U.K. and Malaysia, suggests that, following Brexit, claims concerning events abroad may less frequently proceed to trial in England, say lawyers at Debevoise.

  • 9 Takeaways From The UPC's First 6 Months In Session

    Author Photo

    Six months after its opening, the Unified Patent Court has established itself as an appealing jurisdiction, with its far territorial reach, short filing deadlines and extremely quick issuance of preliminary injunctions showing that it is well-prepared to provide for rapid legal clarity, says Antje Brambrink at Finnegan.

  • How Boards Can Mitigate Privacy, Cybersecurity And AI Risks

    Author Photo

    In 2023, data privacy, cybersecurity and AI persist as prominent C-suite concerns as regulators stepped up enforcement, and organizations must develop a plan for handling these risks, in particular those with a global footprint, say lawyers at Latham.

  • The Year In FRAND: What To Know Heading Into 2024

    Author Photo

    In 2023, there were eight significant developments concerning the fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory patent licensing regime that undergirds technical standardization, say Tom Millikan and Kevin Zeck at Perkins Coie.

  • The Outlook For UK Restructuring Plans At Home And Abroad

    Author Photo

    The U.K. continues to be a center for large-cap, cross-border restructurings, though its competitive edge over the EU in this regard may narrow, while small and medium-sized enterprises are already likely to avoid costly formal processes by reaching out to their secured lenders for restructuring solutions, say Paul Keddie and Timothy Bromley-White at Macfarlanes.

  • Foreign Assets Ruling Suggests New Tax Avoidance Approach

    Author Photo

    The U.K. Supreme Court's recent ruling in His Majesty's Revenue & Customs v. Fisher, which found that the scope of the transfer of foreign assets is narrow, highlights that the days of rampant tax avoidance have been left behind, and that the need for wide-ranging and uncertain tax legislation is lessening, says James Austen at Collyer Bristow.

  • Class Action-Style Claims Are On The Horizon In 2024

    Author Photo

    Following the implementation of an EU directive enabling consumers to bring actions for collective redress, 2024 will likely see the first serious swathe of class action-style cases in Europe, particularly in areas such as cyber exposures, ESG and product liability, says Henning Schaloske at Clyde & Co.

  • Cos. Must Monitor Sanctions Regime As Law Remains Unclear

    Author Photo

    While recent U.K. government guidance and an English High Court's decision in Litasco v. Der Mond Oil, finding that a company is sanctioned when a designated individual is exercising control over it, both address sanctions control issues, disarray in the law remains, highlighting that practitioners should keep reviewing their exposure to the sanctions regime, say lawyers at K&L Gates.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Commercial Litigation UK archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!